KUNM

economic development

Benjamin H via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/30 8a: We talk a lot about the need to bring more jobs to New Mexico, but what about remote workers? There are more opportunities for people to find jobs with outside companies and stay rooted in their own community here. But working from home or outside of an office requires internet access and specific skills to be successful. We'd like to hear from you. Email LetsTalk@kunm.org or call in live during the show.

More Than Balloons: Let's Talk Festivals in New Mexico

Jun 26, 2018
Courtsey of Angela Wilson Photography and the Lavender in the Valley Festival

Let's Talk New Mexico 6/29 8a: When the weekend rolls around, New Mexicans have many options for entertainment and fun. Festivals offer up an opportunity to break out of the weekend monotony of movies and restaurants. Fermented foods, lavender, Greek culture, and of course hot air balloons are just a few items on the New Mexico festival menu. 

Sarah Gustavus

Let's Talk New Mexico 4/5 8a:  Internet access is expensive and often slow in rural communities across New Mexico. How might improving internet speed and access help all New Mexicans  pursue educational and economic opportunities? 

Low Interest Loans For Low Income Communities

Jan 12, 2018
Melorie Begay

Local fair lending advocates are partnering with an out of state loan company to curb predatory lending in New Mexico.

Sounder Bruce via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons


Let's Talk New Mexico 11/16 8a: New Mexico is one of dozens of states and communities vying for Amazon’s second headquarters. Many places are promising hefty incentives to land the deal, just as we did unsuccessfully several years ago for a Tesla facility. Should New Mexico offer incentives to lure big companies that could jumpstart our economy? Email letstalk@kunm.org, use the hashtag #letstalkNM on Twitter or call in live during the show.

Leah Todd

Let’s Talk New Mexico 10/26 8a: In New Mexico and across the West, economies are changing. From agriculture to tech startups, health care and business on tribal lands, communities in New Mexico are working to adapt. 

This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’re looking at communities who are coming up with solutions to the economic changes our state is facing as part of our collaboration with the Solutions Journalism Network's State of Change project. 

Sam Minkler / Courtesy Change Labs

Starting a small business can seem like a huge undertaking. What is your logo going to be? Who is your target market? What approvals do you need from the government? Not to mention just the basics of making your product or providing your service.

These are the kinds of questions Native American entrepreneurs will be working to answer together in Crownpoint on Friday, Oct. 7.

401kcalculator.org via Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

KUNM Call In Show 7/28 8a: New Mexico’s economy is struggling, particularly as energy prices remain low. That has brought job losses and shrinking revenues. Our unemployment rate remains one of the highest in the country. What is hampering New Mexico from diversifying its economy? What are the strengths in our communities that we can tap to grow our existing businesses, while helping new companies launch? 

Victoria Edwards/KUNM

Some developers who build huge housing projects say it’s common sense to ask the community share in the cost of paying for public infrastructure.

Albuquerque Transit / Creative Commons

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 2/11 8a: The city of Albuquerque was approved for a federal grant to build a rapid transit bus system down Central Avenue. The city would also borrow $13 million to fund the project. The design would create a center lane along the corridor for buses running every 7 to 8 minutes.

Downtown Exodus Or Revitalization?

Nov 17, 2015
Mike Tungate via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 11/19 8a:

  

In the past few months there's been an exodus of high-profile companies leaving Albuquerque's downtown area, including nearly half of the big banks, a pioneering restaurant and the city's business newspaper. 

That's left people who work and live downtown worried that the decade-old revitalization effort is failing as economic drivers are attracted to other parts of the city. 

Ed Williams

The idea to build a road connecting the Sunport with Rio Bravo Blvd started back in the late 1980s. But county planners back then ran into a roadblock: the street would need to cut through the South Valley Superfund site just west of I-25 where the Environmental Protection Agency was busy cleaning up groundwater contamination from weapons factories that used to be there.

Folk Art Alliance/Fair Winds Trading

The Santa Fe International Folk Art Market has generated more than $20 million in sales since it began 12 years ago. Most of that money goes home with the artists and supports entire communities. In some cases, shared prosperity also helps heal the effects of trauma.

Santolina: Smart Growth Or Public Health Risk?

May 5, 2015
Mike Tungate via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 5/7 8a: 

Bernalillo County commissioners are considering a residential development plan to build almost 40,000 new homes west of Albuquerque. Developers say it’s a smart, efficient way to plan for population growth and boost the local economy—but critics say it will hurt public health and burden dwindling water supplies. We’ll talk with Santolina’s planning team, public health researchers and South Valley farmers. 

Water A Concern For Santolina Critics, Hearing To Continue In May

Mar 26, 2015

Bernalillo County commissioners did not vote on whether to approve a controversial development plan at a hearing Thursday, instead scheduling additional time for public comments later this year.

Developers say the Santolina Master Plan community could someday be home to as many as 90,000 people.

Opponents spoke at a hearing this week in an effort to convince commissioners to vote down the plan. Many said Santolina would take away needed water resources in Albuquerque's South Valley.

Budget Beefs Up Closing Fund

Mar 21, 2015
starreyez024 via Flickr / Creative Commons License

The New Mexico state Legislature this week passed a $6.23 billion budget (HB 2) that increasing funding for education, job training and other programs. It also includes a tenfold increase in the Local Economic Development Act fund, one of the rare proposals this session that were supported by Democrats as well as Gov. Susana Martinez.

Growing New Mexico's Economy

Feb 3, 2015
StockMonkeys.com via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 2/5 8a: 

New Mexico's economy is heavily reliant on government jobs, tourism and oil and gas revenues. It's stagnant now and many forecasts predict more of the same. What are lawmakers in Santa Fe proposing to stimulate business activity and job growth?  Are any NM communities demonstrating economic success, and what can we learn from them?  

We'd like to hear from you! Email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or call in live during the show. 

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