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Medicaid

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The 2020 census may seem far off still, but some people in New Mexico are already starting to lay the groundwork for the population count that happens once every ten years, and organizers say there’s a lot at stake.

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Dealing with Alzheimer’s disease can take a toll on people emotionally and financially. A local organization is giving a free class in Albuquerque on Thursday about how to handle your finances when dealing with Alzheimer’s.

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The Bernalillo County Commission voted unanimously Tuesday in support of a Medicaid buy-in option. Supporters of the plan hope that this will pressure state lawmakers to make it happen.

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New Mexico officials are hitting the road to talk about changes to Medicaid that will take effect in January. Starting this week, the New Mexico Human Services Department is holding a series of public events across the state to educate residents about upcoming changes to Centennial Care, the state's Medicaid program.

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Bernalillo County commissioners are set to hear a resolution Tuesday that would call on state lawmakers to design a public buy-in program for health insurance coverage.

Adriann Barboa with New Mexico Together for Healthcare said they designed the measure to put pressure on state lawmakers to create something like a Medicaid buy-in option. People who are undocumented or have mixed tribal status could benefit, she said. 

“Folks that are just above the poverty line that don’t currently qualify for Medicaid, so we are really talking about the under ensured,” she said.

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New Mexico was one of the first states in the country to expand its Medicaid program a few years ago.

And now it may also be one of the first to create a Medicaid buy-in program to make insurance more accessible for people who are undocumented or have low incomes.

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Earlier this week, President Donald Trump asked Congress to claw back $7 billion in federal funding for children’s health insurance coverage. But Washington, D.C.,’s decisions probably won’t have an immediate impact here.

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Let’s Talk New Mexico 5/10 8a: About one in four New Mexicans has an EBT card in their wallet that they use to buy food. We’re continuing the conversation this week about food assistance and new work requirements that Congress is considering in the 2018 Farm Bill.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

For decades, families in New Mexico have been missing out on food and medical assistance that they’re eligible for under federal law. Records show that things have gotten better in recent months. Still, the issue’s been in court for 30 years, and a federal judge says one problem is a lack of accountability within the state’s Income Support Division

State May Need Millions To Save Health Care For Kids

Dec 20, 2017
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The Childrens Health Insurance Program covers over 9 million kids nationally, but the well of federal funds has been dry for months, and with strife in Congress, uncertainty lingers.

HSD Moves Ahead With Unpopular Medicaid Changes

Sep 6, 2017
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The New Mexico Human Services Department has been considering charging Medicaid recipients copays in an effort to save money from the state’s cash-strapped budget. The proposals were met with strong opposition in public meetings earlier this year. But the state is moving forward with the changes anyway. 

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Health advocates in New Mexico are urging lawmakers to improve Medicaid and the insurance markets now that Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act have failed. 

LISTEN: Cutting Medicaid To Fix The State Budget

Jul 25, 2017
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KUNM Call In Show 7/27 8a: As New Mexico grapples with a budget crisis, the state is considering whether to save money by making changes to Medicaid—things like charging copays for prescriptions and doctor visits and eliminating dental care for Medicaid recipients. 

Medicaid Copay Plan Met With Strong Opposition

Jul 18, 2017
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New Mexico is considering a plan to charge Medicaid patients copays as a way to save the state money. The proposal is drawing strong criticism from health care groups, poverty advocates and Medicaid recipients.

HSD Considering Medicaid Copays

Jul 14, 2017
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New Mexico allotted $940 million to pay for its share of Medicaid costs this year, but that’s still not enough to keep up with the growing number of people signing up for the program. The state Human Services Department is considering charging copays to people on Medicaid as part of a plan to cut costs.

Protecting Medicaid & Net Neutrality

Jul 14, 2017
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Sun 07/16 7p: This Sunday, join Generation Justice as we focus on July 12th’s Day of Action, where people from across the country made their voices heard about the importance of net neutrality. We’ll be joined by Lucia Martinez, GJ Alumni, and journalist from Free Press, about their Save The Net Campaign. We’ll also hear from Sen. Gerald Ortiz y Pino about the Gov. Martinez’s recent cuts to Medicaid and what it means for NM’s Medicaid program. Be sure to join us live on KUNM 89.9 FM, or online at KUNM.org.

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Poverty advocates say the Republicans’ new plan to repeal and replace Obamacare would leave many low-income people in New Mexico without coverage.

State Sues Presbyterian Over Alleged Fraud

Jul 12, 2017
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New Mexico’s top prosecutor is taking one of the state’s largest health care providers to court over alleged tax fraud. Attorney General Hector Balderas announced the lawsuit against Presbyterian Health Services yesterday.

Health And Aging In New Mexico

Jul 7, 2017
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KUNM Call In Show 7/13 8a: New Mexico’s population is aging fast. But with a high poverty rate, problems with Medicaid, and potential health care cuts on the horizon, this state’s senior citizens are facing a number of challenges. What do you think needs to be done to make sure older New Mexicans get the support they need? Are you a caregiver, health worker or retiree? 

Email callinShow@kunm.org or call in live during the show.

Guests:

Rural Health Care Options Continue To Fall Short

Jun 30, 2017
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What if you’re racing to the hospital, but it’s an hour away – or more? Pregnant women living in northern New Mexico have to cross over sixty miles to deliver their babies with a doctor or midwife. But in this state, half the battle is getting physicians to work in rural areas.

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The Senate released a revised GOP health care bill on Thursday, June 22, with major cuts to Medicaid, reproductive health, and mental health programs widely used by people in New Mexico. Advocates are saying the changes could have long-lasting negative impacts.

Potential Changes To Medicaid Draw Criticism

Jun 15, 2017
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More than three years after the health care expansion, 43 percent of New Mexico’s total population is signed up for Medicaid. But budgets are tight, and the Human Services Department is trying to figure out how to make it all work. Some of the  proposals presented at a public meeting in Albuquerque were contentious.

Heinrich On Medicaid And ACA Overhaul

Jun 14, 2017
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More than 50,000 people in the U.S. died because of an opioid overdose last year, which is an all-time high.

The opioid epidemic was the subject of Congress’s Joint Economic Committee hearing last week. New Mexico Senator Martin Heinrich, a Democrat, is the ranking member of that committee. He spoke with KUNM about the hearing and the prospects for behavioral health in the Republican health care replacement bill. 

HSD To Take Public Comment On Medicaid Overhaul

Jun 13, 2017
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The New Mexico Human Services Department released its plan for the fate of Medicaid, and it includes massive cuts that could sever coverage for thousands.

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New Mexico is one of the poorest states in the union, and advocates fighting for people in poverty are alarmed at President Trump’s proposed budget.

What Does Repeal And Replace Mean For N.M.?

May 10, 2017
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KUNM Call In Show 5/11 8a: Call 1-877-899-5866. With Republican plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act moving through congress, the future of healthcare in New Mexico is facing a lot of uncertainty. We’ll look at what changing the healthcare law could mean for New Mexicans, and for our state’s Medicaid system and insurance markets.

GOP Healthcare Bill Raises Questions, Concerns

May 4, 2017
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Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act passed a major hurdle Thursday after the House of Representatives voted for a new health law, the American Healthcare Act. KUNM’s Chris Boros spoke with Ed Williams of the Public Health New Mexico project about reactions in New Mexico.

Governor Vetoes Home Visiting Bill

Apr 11, 2017
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One of the bills that Governor Susana Martinez vetoed last week would have set up a Medicaid-funded home visiting program for new parents. The move has disappointed some doctors and child advocates.

Advocates Celebrate Withdrawal Of GOP Health Plan

Mar 24, 2017
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Local anti-poverty advocates are thrilled that House Republicans pulled their proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act Friday before a vote. 

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Republicans in Congress have released their plan for replacing the Affordable Care Act and children’s advocates are worried about low-income kids in New Mexico.

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