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THUR: Biden visits New Mexico, New Mexico wins air-monitoring grants, +More

Biden
Evan Vucci/AP
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AP
President Joe Biden speaks during a briefing on the New Mexico wildfires at the New Mexico State Emergency Operations Center, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Santa Fe, N.M. Biden will be speaking in Albuquerque Thursday in support of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham's campaign for re-election. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Joe Biden took off on a personal final-days campaign sprint Thursday that reflects the Democrats' major concerns before next week's midterm elections, appealing to New Mexico voters to defeat “reckless and irresponsible” Republicans and reelect Democratic New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham.

New Mexico is normally safe Democratic territory, but Lujan Grisham is facing a determined challenge from her Republican opponent, former television meteorologist Mark Ronchetti.

At a rally headlined by the president, she warned that Democrats in the state are “a little behind" but assured supporters “we catch up fast.”

In fact, the headwinds facing Lujan Grisham are indicative of the difficulties for Democrats in many parts of the country as Biden set off on a multistate campaign swing largely focused on shoring up support in usual party strongholds.

“Remember this is not a referendum. This is a choice," he said, pointing to the stakes next Tuesday.

Biden said Republicans would follow through on proposals to slice healthcare and retirement benefits if they win control of Congress.

“They’re just saying it," he said. “They’re not even hiding it.”

Biden's itinerary in the campaign's final days illustrates the limited political clout of a president who has been held at arm's length by some Democrats in tough races this cycle. It also suggests that the president, whose approval ratings remain underwater, has concluded that he can be most effective using the waning days before polls close to shore up support for Democratic candidates in areas that he easily won in 2020.

Biden’ four-state, three-day trip includes California, Illinois and Pennsylvania, where Biden has deep roots.

“Democrats are clearly on the defensive and that’s bearing out as the campaign comes to a close,” said Christopher Borick, director of the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion. “Their chances for gains don’t look realistic, so now you look to what you can preserve."

A president's party typically faces significant losses during midterm elections. Since 1934, only Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1934, Bill Clinton in 1998, and George W. Bush in 2002 saw their parties gain seats in the midterms.

Some recent presidents saw big losses in their first midterm races. Republicans under Donald Trump lost 40 House seats but gained two Senate seats in 2018; Democrats under Barack Obama lost 63 House seats and six Senate seats in 2010, and Democrats under Clinton lost 52 House seats and eight Senate seats in 1994.

The decision to deploy Biden to areas where he won handily in 2020 was made in part because of concern about voter energy in races that Democrats view as must-win. Party officials are also concerned about some candidates who have seen their races tighten in the final days of the campaign.

Biden won New Mexico by nearly 11 percentage points in 2020, but Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, who is from the state, warned that this election would be close.

“Republicans are catching up to us," she said. “And we can’t let that happen.”

Fundraising by Ronchetti’s campaign has surged amid visits from Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin. Ronchetti also received a social media endorsement from Trump despite his acknowledgment that Biden won in 2020.

Before speaking at the political rally, Biden went to Central New Mexico Community College to tout his student debt relief program, calling it “a game changer for so many people."

Focusing on young voters whose support Democrats are energetically seeking, Biden said, “Your generation is not going to be ignored. You will not be shunned. You will not be silenced.”

Nearly 26 million people have applied for student loan forgiveness, up 4 million from two weeks ago. About 16 million applications are expected to be approved by the week’s end, but no debt can be forgiven until a legal fight over the program is resolved.

“Republican members of Congress and Republican governors are doing everything they can, including taking us to court, to deny relief, even to their own constituents,” Biden said.

Later Thursday, Biden was joining Rep. Mike Levin for a get-out-the vote event at a community college in Oceanside, California. Levin represents a district with a slight Democratic tilt that cuts through San Diego and Orange counties and that Biden carried by double digits in the 2020 presidential election. Republican nominee Brian Maryott has gone after Levin over inflation, gas prices and rising crime.

Biden is to spend part of Friday and Saturday in the Chicago area, where two-term incumbent Rep. Sean Casten is facing a stiff challenge from Republican Keith Pekau as he tries to hang on to a suburban district that Biden won by a double-digit percentage in 2020. The White House has yet to announce Biden's plans for his time in Chicago.

The Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC aligned with House Republican leaders, this week announced an $1.8 million ad buy to assist Pekau, the mayor of south suburban Orland Park. And Rep. Kevin McCarthy of California, the House minority leader, is due to campaign with Pekau in the district on Friday.

Casten's campaign, in a fundraising email Wednesday, called the crush of super PAC money a “last-ditch effort to buy this seat” and implored his supporters to send him contributions for the campaign's final stretch.

The president on Saturday will head to Pennsylvania to campaign with Obama for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Josh Shapiro and Democratic Senate candidate John Fetterman.

Pennsylvania Democrats are trying to keep control of the governor’s office, which is being vacated by Tom Wolf as he finishes his second term. Fetterman is locked in a tight race with Republican Mehmet Oz, vying for the seat being vacated by the retiring Republican Sen. Pat Toomey.

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Chris Megerian reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Morgan Lee in Santa Fe, New Mexico; Michael R. Blood in San Juan Capistrano, California; and Sara Burnett in Chicago and Collin Binkley in Washington contributed.

New Mexico wins air-monitoring grants - Associated Press

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced grants for projects to monitor air quality in 37 states, including New Mexico with a focus on minority communities and other areas overburdened by pollution. It's part of a commitment by the Biden administration to focus on environmental justice in communities adversely affected by decades of industrial pollution.

A total of 132 projects will receive $53.4 million to enhance air quality monitoring near chemical plants, refineries and other industrial sites. In New Mexico, the grant will fund the installation of air monitors on the Pueblo of San Ildefonso in order to study dust and smoke concentrations near Pueblo housing areas, and a project with the Environment Department to monitor various emissions and their impact on public health.

The grants are funded by the sweeping climate and health law President Joe Biden signed in August and the coronavirus relief plan approved by Congress last year.

Court allows New Mexico utility to delay customer credits - Associated Press

The New Mexico Supreme Court has issued a stay allowing the state’s largest electric utility to delay issuing rate credits related to the recent closure of a coal-fired power plant.

State regulators in June had ordered Public Service Co. of New Mexico, commonly referred to as PNM, to begin issuing the credits since the San Juan Generating Station was shutting down and customers would no longer benefit from it. The utility challenged the order and requested a stay.

The utility has said the cost of doing business has gone up and that delaying credits would mean smaller rate increases for customers in the future

Regulators and consumer advocates argued earlier this year that customers shouldn’t be charged for a power plant that is no longer in operation, and that PNM is reneging on its promise that there would be customer savings when the San Juan Generating Station was shut down.

It's not clear how soon the state Supreme Court could make a decision on the merits of the case.

City of Portales without water after leak found in main line - Associated Press
The city of Portales will be without water until a leak in the 24-inch main water line can be repaired, authorities said Thursday.

City crews found the leak overnight and were working to fix the problem, but officials said there was no immediate timetable for the repairs to be completed.

Portales officials said city offices and schools were closed Thursday along with Eastern New Mexico University.

Authorities said non-potable water was available at the Portales Fire Department Station 1.

They say people will need to bring their own container to fill up and each household was limited to five gallons.

City Agrees to $17M in gender pay settlement — Jessica Dyer, The Albuquerque Journal

The city of Albuquerque will pay out $17 million to settle a collective action lawsuit brought by women who say the city paid them less than their male counterparts.

The Albuquerque Journal reports the settlement, which still needs a judges approval, will pay the plaintiffs and other class action members the difference between what they were paid and what they should have earned going back to 2013.

They will be entitled to the same pay as the base salary of the highest paid male with the same job description.

An attorney for the plaintiffs said that could mean anywhere from a few hundred dollars to more than $100,000 dollars depending on the individual plaintiff’s situation.

Court allows New Mexico utility to delay customer credits — Associated Press

The New Mexico Supreme Court has cleared the way for the state's largest electric utility to delay issuing rate credits related to the recent closure of a coal-fired power plant.

State regulators in June had ordered Public Service Co. of New Mexico to begin issuing the credits since the San Juan Generating Station was shutting down. The utility challenged the order and requested a stay.

The utility has said the cost of doing business has gone up and that delaying credits would mean smaller rate increases for customers in the future.

Utility spokesman Ray Sandoval told the Santa Fe New Mexican that the utility was pleased with the decision.

"All parties had the opportunity to fully present their views to the court, and the court fully considered those positions in deciding that the stay should remain in place," Sandoval wrote in an email.

Regulators and consumer advocates argued earlier this year that customers shouldn't be charged for a power plant that is no longer in operation.

"In exchange for a bailout, PNM promised the legislators, the court and the people that there would be customer savings when PNM abandoned San Juan," said Mariel Nanasi, executive director of New Energy Economy, a frequent critic of the utility. "PNM failed on its promise and customers are still being charged, which is particularly harmful during these inflationary times."

It's not clear how soon the state Supreme Court could make a decision on the merits of the case.