KUNM

Hannah Colton

Interim News Director, Public Health Reporter

Currently serving as interim news director at KUNM, Hannah Colton covers education, Albuquerque politics, and anything public health-related. She started at KUNM as a substitute news host in 2016, and worked as a freelance reporter and host for KSFR Santa Fe Public Radio and National Native News before joining KUNM full time in  2018. She's grateful to have gotten her start in radio at KDLG (another 89.9 FM) in Bristol Bay, Alaska. 

AllenS / Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico’s three Roman Catholic dioceses have begun the process of turning over thousands of records related to priest sex abuse and cover-up.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

A prominent New Mexico lawmaker threatened to shut the public out of a legislative committee meeting concerning a landmark education lawsuit after journalists brought recording equipment.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The FBI says a former Catholic priest who fled the country in 1992 after being accused of child sexual abuse has been extradited from Morocco to face criminal charges in New Mexico.

Arthur Perrault appeared in federal court in Albuquerque Friday afternoon and pleaded not guilty to seven counts of abuse. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The 2020 census may seem far off still, but some people in New Mexico are already starting to lay the groundwork for the population count that happens once every ten years, and organizers say there’s a lot at stake.

Jonathan Lindberg, U.S. Coast Guard

New Mexico officials are hitting the road to talk about changes to Medicaid that will take effect in January. Starting this week, the New Mexico Human Services Department is holding a series of public events across the state to educate residents about upcoming changes to Centennial Care, the state's Medicaid program.

Hannah Colton

The Archdiocese of Santa Fe now acknowledges 78 New Mexico priests accused of sexually abusing children since the 1930s. But many other accused priests from elsewhere in the United States spent time at treatment centers run by a Catholic order called the Servants of the Paraclete in New Mexico.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

On Tuesday, Sept. 4, New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas ordered the state’s three Roman Catholic dioceses to give up decades’ worth of church records relating to allegations of sexual abuse and cover-up. Church leaders in Santa Fe, Gallup and Las Cruces have all said they'll cooperate. KUNM sat down with Balderas to talk about the investigation.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Without fanfare, the Archdiocese of Santa Fe updated its website last week with more information about where and when priests accused of sexual abuse worked in New Mexico.

Courtesy of VCINM

When a hospital or doctor’s office sees a patient who doesn’t speak English, federal law requires the institution to hire an interpreter. But the need for professional language services in New Mexico far exceeds the supply. An Albuquerque organization, Valley Community Interpreters (VCI), is hoping to change that.

Amanda Mills / U.S. Center For Disease Control And Prevention

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/23 8a: Allergies to foods like nuts, milk and seafood are on the rise, and they can be life-threatening. As New Mexico students settle into a new school year, we'll look at what teachers and school staff are doing to look out for all children.

Do your kids have allergies? How does it go for them at school? Have you been able to access life-saving medication like an EpiPen? Email LetsTalk@kunm.org or call in live during the show at 277-5866.

U.S. Air Force / Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade

A New Mexico nonprofit health insurance company is suing the federal government for a second time over regulations it says drive up insurance premiums and threaten smaller insurers.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Dozens of refugee families resettle in Albuquerque each year, and their children begin attending school here. In mid-August, Albuquerque Public Schools is slated to launch a program for newcomers, but immigrant advocates say it’s been planned poorly and will be hard to access. For many refugee families, getting transportation to a special school outside their neighborhood is nearly impossible. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

New Mexico’s Public Education Department is planning to appeal a court ruling last month that found the state violated the rights of at-risk students by failing to provide an adequate education. Judge Sarah Singleton’s decision doesn’t tell the department exactly what changes to make but says it must do better by its low-income students, Native American students, those with disabilities and English-language learners.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/2 8a: Research shows that learning about one's own history and culture can keep students engaged and lead to better educational outcomes. A recent court ruling found New Mexico's Public Education Department is failing its Native American students, in part by not providing adequate culturally relevant materials. Did you have access to Native American Studies or classes taught in your Native language?

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Albuquerque Public Schools plans to open a new program next month for students who don’t speak English and have little to no prior formal schooling. But some say that program is set up for failure. Dozens of advocates and students gathered Monday evening in Albuquerque’s South Valley to call for more transparency and accountability in the way APS designs educational services for immigrant and refugee children.  

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