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Born From The Stars: Native Astronomy

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Joseph Gruber via Flickr
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Thurs. 03/19 11a: There’s a story told by the Skidi Pawnee about Mars and Venus, two bright stars in the sky. Mars, or a male god, travels across the sky to meet with Venus, a female god. Along the way, he has to battle a bear, serpent and a wildcat — among other constellations in the sky. When the gods meet, they create the first human, a girl. Since the beginning of time, Indigenous people all over the world have looked to the stars for the answers to life, religion, culture, origins and the future. What do the stars say to Native Americans?

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