Afghanistan

Bernat Armangue / Associated Press

For families around the world trying to evacuate loved ones from Afghanistan, time has run out. Mohmmad Ismail  served as an interpreter for U.S. forces in Afghanistan and like many who worked for the United States, he was threatened by the Taliban. He came to Albuquerque in 2013 on a special visa, but his family members stayed behind. He worked with the State Department and U.S. Senators Martin Heinrich and Ben Ray Luján from New Mexico to get his family and other family members related to Albuquerque residents during the evacuation period, but he was unsuccessful. 

Mohammad Ismail

Mohmmad Ismail served as an interpreter for U.S. forces in Afghanistan and like many who worked for the United States, he was threatened by the Taliban. He came here in 2013 on a special visa, but his family members then faced threats. Eventually they followed him to New Mexico, where he works with children on refugee status for Albuquerque Public Schools. Now the Taliban are targeting his relatives who are still in Afghanistan and he is asking New Mexico politicians for help to get them out.

  

Sgt. Samuel Ruiz/US Marine Corps / Associated Press


  Let’s Talk New Mexico 8/26 8 am: Thousands of people are fleeing Afghanistan since the Taliban’s takeover and Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham has announced that New Mexico is ready to welcome them with open arms. How can our state best ready itself to receive these refugees? What type of services are already available? How will all of this work while we are still struggling with a global pandemic? On this week’s episode, we’ll be talking to folks who work with New Mexico’s refugee population, as well as the refugees themselves, about their experiences and how they think our state should respond to this sudden need. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Dozens of refugee families resettle in Albuquerque each year, and their children begin attending school here. In mid-August, Albuquerque Public Schools is slated to launch a program for newcomers, but immigrant advocates say it’s been planned poorly and will be hard to access. For many refugee families, getting transportation to a special school outside their neighborhood is nearly impossible. 

Soldier Weighs Trump’s War Plans

Aug 29, 2017
Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Before last year’s presidential election, University of New Mexico student Joshua Ramirez was paying careful attention to what the candidates were saying about national security and foreign policy. He’s a third-generation soldier and a Republican. He’s already served for a year in Kuwait, and anytime through October, he could be called to duty.

Illustration from NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation Monday night, beginning at 9:00 PM ET, on U.S. engagement and "the path forward" in Afghanistan and South Asia. Senior U.S. officials tell NPR that the president is expected to order about 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan. The decision follows months of deliberation within the Trump Administration, involving top military commanders, political advisers and even enlisted veterans of the nearly 16-year war. NPR journalists from across the newsroom are offering context and analysis about President Trump's remarks.

Woman's execution sparks protests in Afghanistan, Seventeen magazine bows to teen's petition campaign, nuns wrap up bus tour protesting federal cuts,  new pro-lesbian super PAC forms, Saudi Arabia sends female athletes to Olympics, Helen Mirren calls for more female directors

The number of U.S. soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder continues to grow as a result of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Commentator Craig Barnes says soldiers who suffer from PTSD deserve assistance and understanding.

Craig Barnes is a writer, playwright, and former international negotiator. He lives in Santa Fe.