KUNM

Albuquerque City Council

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Council District 2 in Albuquerque is home to the city’s oldest neighborhoods, the ones people often think of when they’re talking about the character of this place. That’s areas like Martineztown, Barelas, Duranes, Downtown, San Jose, Well’s Park. Voters there are choosing who will represent them on the Council, which has a lot of say in how those neighborhoods grow—and which companies get to move in. KUNM spoke about balancing the past and the future with a longtime Council incumbent and the newcomer gunning for his seat in a runoff election.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Throughout U.S. history, industries that dump toxic waste into the air, water and soil get put in neighborhoods where low-income people of color live. Advocates from historic neighborhoods in Albuquerque are calling for a real chance to make changes to city zoning rules, because they say the city's planning process was racially biased and ignored their concerns in favor of developers. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

When unknown political newcomers go up against a sitting city councilor with good name recognition, the politician who people know will usually win. Four Albuquerque City Council seats were on the ballot Tuesday, Nov. 5, and there was a big field of challengers for their seats. In two cases, the people in power did keep their positions, but longtime Councilor Isaac Benton is facing a runoff.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

People in far Northeast Albuquerque were set to elect a new city councilor for the first time in 20 years on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Councilor Brad Winter is giving up his seat in District 4, and three candidates campaigned for his spot. But none of them cornered over 50 percent of the vote, which is what it takes to win. So Brook Bassan and Ane Romero are heading for a runoff. KUNM spoke to voters in District 4 on Election Day.

Tom Arthur / Wikimedia Commons

Early voting has begun in Albuquerque, and for the first time, voters can register and vote all within the same day. This could help historically underrepresented groups access the polls more easily.

Some voters may not know they are eligible to vote, like New Mexico’s homeless population. 

 

Bernalillo County Clerk Linda Stover said a home address isn’t necessary for someone to register to vote. People just need a mailing address, and that can be a post office box or a shelter. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Big-money influences political races at every level around the U.S. Part of the answer, advocates say, is giving candidates access to public money for their campaigns. Albuquerque voters are weighing a ballot question aimed at making the local campaign financing system a more realistic and competitive option.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Forty-five people turned in paperwork Tuesday to run for office in a slew of local elections in Bernalillo County. Local government, education, and soil and water conservancy seats will all be on county ballots this November.

Plastic Bag Ban Goes To Albuquerque City Council

Jan 9, 2019
velkr0 via flickr / Creative Commons License

The Albuquerque city council on Monday heard a proposal to ban single-use plastic at all business and retail locations.

The proposal includes anything made to be used once and then thrown out or recycled, like straws, bags and coffee stirrers. It also includes styrofoam.

Albuquerque City Councilors Approve Tax Increase

Mar 6, 2018
Debernardi via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons


The Albuquerque city council voted to raise gross receipts taxes by 0.375 percent Monday night and balance the city’s budget for the next year. The measure would generate around $50 million.

Sarah Gustavus

A proposal to decriminalize recreational cannabis in Albuquerque would do away with jail time and shrink fines. Co-sponsor Albuquerque City Councilor Pat Davis said the time is right and the measure has a lot of support. He also said it would also help police focus on more pressing things.

Hanlly Sam via CC


Let’s Talk New Mexico 1/18 8a: Call now 277-KUNM or 277-5866. Albuquerque’s City Council passed the Pedestrian Safety Ordinance late last year, which makes it illegal for people to stand near freeway ramps or in medians and to interact with drivers. It’s also illegal for drivers to interact with people standing in those spaces.

 

Do you think the law is helpful to public safety and will help prevent pedestrian deaths or traffic accidents? Or do you think it targets people experiencing extreme poverty in Albuquerque? Is the law a violation of free speech or other constitutionally guaranteed rights?

Nicolás Boullosa via Compfight CC

Tiny homes are being praised around the country as an affordable solution to homelessness. Voters in Bernalillo County approved 2 million dollars a year ago to launch a tiny home village project for people experiencing homelessness in the Albuquerque area.

Incentives For Equal Pay, Do They Work?

May 13, 2015
red5standingby via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 5/14 8a:  

The Albuquerque City Council passed a pay equity ordinance last week that provides incentives to companies that pay women at least 90 percent of what they pay men in comparable jobs. The ordinance is being lauded as a national model, but does it go far enough? We'd like to hear from you! Email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or call in live during the show. 

Guests:

Bosque Construction Continues

Feb 19, 2015
Rita Daniels

City Councilors in Albuquerque voted Wednesday to halt construction of a trail in the Rio Grande bosque. Many nature advocates say their trust was damaged when the city started cutting a six-foot wide path through the forest along the banks of the river without giving public notice.

People's Choice: Decriminalize Marijuana?

Sep 8, 2014
Alexa Graham via Flickr / Creative Commons License

    

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 9/11 8a

The Santa Fe City Council approved a measure decriminalizing marijuana. Albuquerque's Mayor Richard Berry vetoed a similar proposal. And now the Bernalillo County Commission is planning to ask voters if they think possession of small amounts of marijuana should mean fines instead of jail sentences.

We'll ask what decriminalization means for individuals and government agencies in New Mexico. Is decriminalization a stepping stone to legalization on a statewide level? What are the benefits? What are potential pitfalls?