KUNM

Albuquerque Journal

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  Let's Talk New Mexico 1/16 8a: We’re going to look back at the local news stories that affected New Mexicans last year and at how they might develop in the year ahead. And we’re going to talk about how these topics will impact the upcoming legislative session. Our guests will walk us through their picks for the most notable, important or interesting news stories they covered in 2019—from immigration to liver transplants to education—and how it made a difference to the people who live in our state.

 

And we want to hear from you! What New Mexico news stories stood out for you in 2019? Or what national events affected your life? Email Letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet us at #LetsTalkNM, or call in live during the show.

 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Big-money influences political races at every level around the U.S. Part of the answer, advocates say, is giving candidates access to public money for their campaigns. Albuquerque voters are weighing a ballot question aimed at making the local campaign financing system a more realistic and competitive option.

West Midlands Police via Twitter / Creative Commons License

New evidence has shattered the widely believed narrative of how 10-year-old Victoria Martens was killed in Albuquerque. Right after her death in 2016, detectives interviewed her mother Michelle, and based on that, they pinned the homicide on her and two other adults. But two years later, the District Attorney says that story is false, and DNA evidence points to another killer, who’s still out there.

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Let's Talk New Mexico 2/15 8a. Call 277-5866 - Diversity has increasingly become a buzz word for businesses and industries in recent years and that includes the journalism industry, as newsrooms struggle to better represent the communities they serve. Here in New Mexico, the recent publication of a racist cartoon by the state's largest newspaper sparked a firestorm of criticism. We'll discuss racism in the news and diversity in newsrooms. 

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The Albuquerque Journal’s decision to publish a racist cartoon in its editorial section on Wednesday, Feb. 7, drew a lot of criticism locally and across the country. Statements from the paper’s editors afterward didn’t do much to quell the outrage.

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The Albuquerque Journal is facing a backlash after publishing a racist editorial cartoon on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

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Let’s Talk New Mexico 9/21 8a: It’s the No. 1 issue on voters’ minds heading into the municipal election on October 3. Some mayoral and Council candidates in Albuquerque are calling for more police officers on the force and a new police chief. What do you think it will take to decrease the number of violent crimes and property crimes?

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KUNM Year-End Show 12/22 8a: There were so many big stories in New Mexico this year that it was hard to pare down a list. Instead, our panel of journalists is going to be talking about four themes: child abuse and wellbeing, N.M. law enforcement, politics and SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program).

Public Library of Science journal via Wikimedia / Creative Commons License

A congressional investigation into researchers who use fetal tissue and the abortion clinics that provide the tissue has recently expanded to include New Mexico.

Library of Congress via CC

Albuquerque’s City Council will consider an ordinance in August aimed at helping part-time workers, but small business owners and employers say it’s unrealistic.