cannabis

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Tuesday, 12/08, 8a: New Mexico's medical cannabis program has spurred the creation of numerous companies in the state, from growers to dispensaries to production facilities. Advocates for recreational cannabis tout its potential to bring an even bigger economic boom, but there are also unique challenges to running a cannabis-based business.

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Tuesday, 12/01, 8a: New Mexico's medical cannabis industry has already produced a number of successful entrepreneurs and companies who could see even more benefits from legal recreational cannabis in New Mexico. On this episode we look at some of the major players in the state. We also explore the barriers to entry to the cannabis industry, a point of contention for those who want legalization to also include mechanisms that help communities most damaged by the war on drugs to share in the largesse of a legal, and lucrative, cannabis industry.

Tuesday, 11/24, 8a: The push for the legalization of recreational cannabis has really picked up in recent years in the New Mexico legislature. In this week's episode, we look back at those efforts to date, and the strategy behind the legislation proposed in past sessions.

Tuesday, 11/10, 8a:  The New Mexico Legislature will almost certainly take up legalizing recreational cannabis in January. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has made it is a priority, and lawmakers are debating the merits and downsides of legalization.

This is why NM Political Report and New Mexico PBS, with the help of a grant from the New Mexico Local News Fund, launched “Growing Forward” a 10-episode podcast examining cannabis. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

In episode 76, we discuss criminal justice reform, from policing to prisons. We get a preview of the Albuquerque mayor and a city councilor plans to remake the public safety system. A criminal justice reporter tells us about COVID-19 in state prisons and reminds us that there is little race or ethnicity data to show us who is affected. But first, YNMG Executive Producer Marisa Demarco tells us what it was like to be at a protest this week where someone she knows was shot by a man trying to protect a statue of a genocidal Spanish conquistador. 

Arianna Sena / KUNM

The 2020 legislative session is over. Gene Grant, host of New Mexico In Focus, recaps the biggest moments and topics, like the red-flag law (which passed), recreational marijuana (which didn't), free college tuition (partially funded) and more.

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This podcast is part of the project: Your N.M. Government. Funding for our legislative coverage is provided, in part, by the Thornburg Foundation, the New Mexico Local News Fund and KUNM listeners. 

Let's Talk Wrapping Up The 2020 Legislative Session

Feb 18, 2020
Hannah Colton / KUNM


  Let's Talk New Mexico 2/20 8a: The 2020 legislative session finishes up Thursday. As those final hours close in, we’ll discuss where high-profile proposals stand – like the red-flag firearm bill, and recreational cannabis – as well as the fate of some important bills that you may have not heard of.

 

And we want to hear from you. Which proposals were you happy to see pass? Which stalled bills frustrated you? Email LetsTalk@kunm.org, tweet using #LetsTalkNM, or call in live during the show.

 

NEW: We're partnering with NMPBS to livestream video of the Thursday call-in show. Watch live at New Mexico PBS or KUNM on Facebook, or listen as always on 89.9 FM or KUNM.org.

 

Waferboard via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Kaveh Mowahed comes into the studio to talk about lobbyists and ethics. The New Mexico Ethics Watch commission just released a report. (Check it out here.) It has a few recommendations to help add more transparency to our state government. Listen close as Kaveh and I talk about the latest developments. 

n8agrin via flickr

New Mexico is among a handful of states that allow vague reporting on spending by lobbyists – people whose business it is to push an issue at the Roundhouse or otherwise try to influence the government. A new report last month shows how money is being spent and highlights the lack of transparency when it comes to money in politics. Executive Director of New Mexico Ethics Watch, Kathleen Sabo, sat down with KUNM to talk about the group's findings.

H. Zell via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons

Hemp was legalized in last year’s legislative session and this year, a bill that would legalize recreational marijuana is moving through the Legislature. The new hemp farms in New Mexico could pose a risk to outdoor marijuana crops.

Hemp and marijuana are different strains of the same plant. However, Jill Browning, chairwoman of the New Mexico Hemp Association, says the two industries differ in how they grow, produce and manufacture their products. “There is one thing that overlaps, and that is pollenization," she said.

John Miller via Pixabay / Creative Commons

A bill that would legalize recreational marijuana in New Mexico stalled in the Senate last year. Over the summer, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham convened a work group to study the issue and gather public comment, and the group released recommendations for legalization that—among other things—prioritized equity for people who have been disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs. Rep. Javier Martínez, one of the sponsors of this year’s bill, spoke with KUNM about this year’s proposal, which passed out of the Senate Public Affairs Committee on a 4-3 party-line vote Tuesday, Jan. 28. 

PED To Finalize Rules For Medical Cannabis In Schools

Jul 24, 2019
Monika Stawowy via PXHere / public domain

As kids head back to school soon, districts must contend with a new state law allowing students with a medical marijuana prescription to take their medicine at school. New Mexico health and education officials are working to iron out details like how schools will store medication and who can administer it.

Pixabay via CC

People in Albuquerque may think getting busted with a little marijuana results in only a ticket and a fine. But state police officers were sent to Albuquerque in May to crack down on crime, and they’re enforcing state law. That means there’s still a way for even small amounts of weed or paraphernalia to put people here in cuffs.

Alexa Graham via Flickr / Creative Commons License

 


There could be more peace of mind for people in Albuquerque who don’t qualify for the state’s medical cannabis program if Mayor Tim Keller signs a measure city councilors passed on Monday. It would decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis.

 

Sarah Gustavus

A proposal to decriminalize recreational cannabis in Albuquerque would do away with jail time and shrink fines. Co-sponsor Albuquerque City Councilor Pat Davis said the time is right and the measure has a lot of support. He also said it would also help police focus on more pressing things.

Sarah Gustavus

KUNM Call In Show 12/15 8a: State lawmakers learned this month the projected state budget will be $69 million short in the current fiscal year and revenue projections are down for the next fiscal year. New Mexico’s economy is highly dependent on oil and gas revenues. Could a recreational cannabis industry, similar to neighboring Colorado, change the economic outlook for the state?

Medical Pot Program Rule Changes Softened

Jul 18, 2014
eggrole via Flickr

The state Department of Health will not be moving forward with two proposed rule changes to New Mexico’s medical marijuana program.  The program’s advocates say it looks like the Governor Susana Martinez's administration is finally starting to see things from the patient’s point of view.  

At an interim legislative committee hearing on Thursday a spokesman from the Department of Health surprised virtually everyone in the room when he announced they had decided to back off some proposed changes, including reducing the number of plants a patient could grow for themselves.