KUNM

Cathryn McGill

YNMG & COVID: To Be Heard And Counted

Apr 23, 2020
Kodak Views via Flickr CC

Episode 49 is all about the elections that are still coming up and the 2020 census. Advocates tell us that New Mexico is hard to count because it's big, area-wise, and because plenty of communities are intentionally discouraged from filling it out through fear tactics. The census determines how much federal funding comes to the state for all kinds of programs over the next 10 years, and it's how voting districts are determined. If brown and black communities around the U.S. don't participate in the census, advocates tell us, their political power is diluted. 

Census HTC 2020 map / CUNY Mapping Service

  Let's Talk New Mexico 2/6 8a: The 2020 Census begins in April, and it will determine New Mexico's congressional representation and the allocation of federal dollars for programs like Medicaid, CHIP and SNAP. This week, we’ll discuss why it's hard to get a complete count here, and what organizers are doing to reach communities that have historically been undercounted. Do you have concerns about how the federal government use your information? Do you benefit from a program that uses Census data for funding purposes? Email Letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet us at #LetsTalkNM, or call in live during the show.

 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The 2020 Census is coming up this spring. The once-every-decade survey determines how much federal funding New Mexico gets for things like food and housing assistance, and the state stands to lose hundreds of millions of dollars for even a slight undercount. Now, organizers across Bernalillo County are strategizing to get as many residents as possible to fill out that form.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

People took to the streets all over the world, around the country and here in New Mexico for a second year of women’s marches. The concerns they raised were broad, including protecting the environment, fighting systemic racism, health care access, police violence and immigration reform.