CDC

Marco Fileccia via Unsplash / Creative Commons

The state Public Education Department Monday, July 26, released updated COVID-19 guidance for next school year. The next day, the CDC released stricter guidance on masking for K-12 students in response to rising cases linked largely to the Delta variant. Education Secretary Ryan Stewart spoke with KUNM’s Nash Jones about building out new COVID-safe practices for the state’s schools in a shifting landscape.

Schools Get Mixed Messaging On Mask Policies

Jul 21, 2021

News Brief

Experts largely agree that schools should open to in-person learning this fall, but there’s disagreement on masking policies.

The CDC recommends, “Masks should be worn indoors by all individuals (age 2 and older) who are not fully vaccinated.”

Tom.Arthur via Flickr / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/


Let’s Talk New Mexico 6/17 8am: Last September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention instituted a moratorium on residential evictions to keep people without secure incomes from losing their homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. New Mexico followed suit with a similar state-wide protection order. For ten months the moratoriums have protected thousands of New Mexico renters, but at the same time back rents have continued to accrue and landlords have gone without the income they count on. With the national order protecting tenants scheduled to expire on June 30th and no clear endpoint for the state’s moratorium, there is potential for a massive number of evictions if nothing is done. Join us this week as we discuss the national and state residential eviction moratoriums, as well as programs set up to help tenants get caught up on payments.    

David Jackmanson / flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

As housing prices skyrocket, unemployment persists and wages are stagnant, housing security has become urgent. A federal judge last week struck down the CDC’s eviction moratorium.

Porapak Apichodilok via Pexels / Creative Commons

Overdose deaths have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the CDC, and many people are delaying or avoiding medical care due to concerns about the virus. The New Mexico Crisis and Access Line decided to partner with Digital Therapeutics Group LLC so those living with addictions can get support online. Launched in November with funding from the Department of Human Services Behavioral Health Division, the 5-Actions Program is free and anonymous. KUNM’s Nash Jones spoke with the app’s creator, John Fitzgerald, to learn more about the program.

Nash Jones / KUNM

Albuquerque Public Schools and the Albuquerque Teachers Federation came to an agreement Thursday that all teachers will have the option to work remotely for at least the first month of the semester. The memo adds some clarity to a plan the school board passed last week that says students will go to a hybrid model after Labor Day if it’s safe to do so. But it’s unclear what the public health data will need to look like for schools to be considered “safe.” And teachers with underlying conditions could lose their school placements if they get accommodations to teach online for the whole semester.

YNMG: Walking The COVID Beat

Apr 22, 2020
Hannah Colton / KUNM

Episode 48 dives back into how the pandemic is affecting people experiencing homelessness. KUNM's Hannah Colton goes further into the story of the city breaking up encampments, despite the CDC advising against it during this time, and she brings us the perspective of Cypher Johnson, who's passing through Albuquerque and spending time on the streets. We talk to people who work with unsheltered folks around the state about what an outbreak at a shelter would mean for the whole community, about what needs to change right now—and what needs to change in the future. We also hear from the Albuquerque Police Department and the Las Cruces Police Department about how coronavirus has changed things for them philosophically and practically. 

Reese Brown via CC

In episode 44, we talk about CDC data and state data showing that the virus is harming, disproportionately, brown and black people around the U.S.—and here at home. We hear from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez about the bureaucratic hurdles to accessing billions of dollars allotted to tribes in the relief package, and why that money hasn't reached the ground yet, despite the dire public health emergency unfolding for tribes.

YNMG & COVID: Hospital Readiness

Apr 2, 2020
Hannah Colton / KUNM

In episode 34,  we discover how prepared hospitals and health care facilities in New Mexico really are. And we go all over the state for this one.

Vaping Illness Cases Rise To 12 In New Mexico

Sep 11, 2019
Lindsay Fox via Flickr / Creative Commons License

There are more cases of vaping-related illnesses appearing all over the country, and New Mexico is no exception. 

JESSICA7191 VIA PIXABAY / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

New Mexico’s been fighting the opioid epidemic for decades, but it wasn’t until last year that the federal government declared it a public health emergency. Congress just pumped up the budget for fighting the epidemic by billions, including $100 million for rural areas. But none of the rural counties in our state were targeted for that money. Now that’s changing.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Congress boosted the budget for the battle against the opioid epidemic this year, and a chunk of it—$100 million—is slated for treatment and prevention in rural communities. But something about how lawmakers chose to prioritize that money caught a New Mexico health official by surprise: the funding is focused on counties that are mostly white.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The federal government is distributing grant money to counties to fight opioid addiction. But Española and the surrounding area might not get any of it, even though communities there have struggled for years with some of the highest overdose death rates in the country.

Daneil Pienado via CC

It’s World Breastfeeding Week, and proponents are looking at how New Mexico treats new mothers.

Pedestrian Fatalities In Low-Income Neighborhoods

Jun 18, 2015
Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Around the country, pedestrian deaths are most common in low-income areas. And New Mexico has had the highest average rate of pedestrian deaths in the U.S. for the last few years, according to the CDC. 

CDC Backs Long-Term Birth Control For Teens

Apr 8, 2015
Contreleurope via CC

New Mexico still had the highest teen pregnancy rate in the U.S. last year, but the good news is that it’s declining—here and in the rest of the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a recommendation this week for how to drop the rate even further.

Overdose-Reversing Drug Saves Hundreds In N.M.

Jan 12, 2015
PunchingJudy via flickr CC

A drug called naloxone reversed more than 700 overdoses in New Mexico last year. But hurdles remain for making the drug more widely available. 

Naloxone—brand name Narcan—can be prescribed by pharmacists, not just doctors, and Medicaid covers the cost. In 2014, those big policy changes resulted in a spike of overdose reversals. 

Halloween Safety Tips

Oct 31, 2014
B.C. Lorio via Flickr

Tonight before you send the kids out trick-or-treating, here are a few things to keep in mind for a safe Halloween.

Children should avoid going out trick-or-treating alone, according to the CDC. Loose-fitting clothing or masks can be dangerous as they can cause tripping and vision obstruction.

Kids who wear bright clothing or reflective tape are more visible in the dark.  Carry flashlights and walk on the sidewalk.

Concern About Ebola Readiness At Santa Fe Hospital

Oct 16, 2014
Public Health Image Library via CC

Earlier this week, there was a brief Ebola scare at Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center in Santa Fe. A patient was isolated, and though it turned out to be a false alarm, hospital workers are questioning whether the hospital is ready to handle the disease.

UNMH Patient Tested For Ebola

Aug 18, 2014
Dr. Randal J. Schoepp via Army Medicine / Creative Commons

The Department of Health sent clinical samples to the CDC today to make sure a New Mexico patient doesn’t have the Ebola virus. 

A 30-year-old woman in Albuquerque went to the hospital this weekend with a sore throat, headache, muscle aches and a fever after returning from a trip to West Africa, where an Ebola epidemic this year has killed more than 1,000 people.

via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Diabetes is on the rise across the U.S. according to a report released this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One out of every eleven American adults has diabetes, or 9.3 percent, up one percent over the last three years.  That equates to more than three million new diabetics.

Overdose Drug Covered by Medicaid

Jun 19, 2014
PunchingJudy via Creative Commons

  New Mexico has the second-highest rate of overdose deaths in the country, according to the CDC. Now, a life-saving drug called naloxone is not only available by prescription, the cost of it is covered through Medicaid.

State To Pay, Certify Promotoras

Jun 4, 2014
Deborah Martinez

new law aimed at paying community health workers will kick in this summer. These women and men provide health and social services to their neighbors and act as a vital link between time-strapped doctors and their patients.  Health promoters – or promotoras – are helping homebound New Mexicans get the healthcare they need.

Editor's Note: This story has been taken down as it contained text from a Farmington Daily Times article on the same topic without proper attribution. We strive for proper attribution in our reporting and will post the KUNM News Reporting Guide when it is completed which will include details on our newsroom ethics and practices. Questions? Please contact News Director Elaine Baumgartel - elaineb@kunm.org

NCI to Study Effects of Trinity Test

Mar 25, 2014
lanl.gov via Public Domain

  The National Cancer Institute will come to New Mexico this spring to investigate how much radiation people were exposed to after the Trinity test in the southern part of the state nearly 70 years ago.

The CDC studied health hazards in the New Mexico and said state residents consumed radiation via water, milk, meat and produce grown here after July 16, 1945, when the U.S. Army detonated a nuclear weapon for the first time.

Preschool Obesity Rates Drop Nationally

Feb 26, 2014
Rita Daniels

Young children are beginning to show signs of lower obesity rates – 43 percent over ten years, according to a new Centers for Disease Control Study.  

The study doesn’t break down the decline state by state, but the news doesn’t surprise Judy Baron.  She’s a co-director of the Serendipity Day School for 2 to 4 year-olds in Albuquerque.

What Is Public Health?

Feb 20, 2014
cdc.gov / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 2/20 8a:  What is public health?  Maybe the term makes you think of vaccinations or controlling and preventing diseases like diabetes and influenza.  But the field is much larger than that.  

Call 277-5866 in Albuquerque or toll-free 1-877-899-5866.

Debora Cartagena, CDC

Native Americans have the highest rates of smoking before, during and after pregnancy than any other ethnic group in the nation. That’s according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control.

According to the CDC, 55 percent of Native American women smoked before pregnancy. During pregnancy, that rate dropped significantly to 26 percent. However, that rate was still the highest of any racial or ethnic group in the nation.

Centers for Disease Control

A new survey ranks the United States 11th in the number of reported plague cases around the world. Of the cases found in the U.S. over the last decade, most infections were acquired in the Southwest.

National Salmonella Outbreak Linked To New Mexico

Aug 20, 2013
Centers for Disease Control

More than 300 people in 37 states have been infected by salmonella, many of which were children. Investigators have linked the source of the outbreak to a chicken, duck and turkey hatchery in Eastern New Mexico.


In the Southwest, nine people have been infected in California, eight in Arizona, 19 in New Mexico, and 32 in Texas.

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