Civil Rights

Gage Skidmore via CC

 

President Biden declared his intention to fight the rise in domestic terrorism, extremism and white supremacy in his inaugural address after the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6. But as Congress weighs how to work on this longstanding American problem, a coalition of civil rights organizations sent a letter to the nation’s lawmakers saying they should not create a new domestic terrorism law. KUNM’s Khalil Ekulona spoke with Becky Monroe of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights about the group’s concerns.

The Mountain West is home to dozens of far-right extremist groups. In the wake of the U.S. Capitol riots on January 6, lawmakers are mulling how to protect the nation from domestic terrorism. Some have pushed for Congress to create a new domestic terrorism charge.

 

But this week 135 civil rights organizations came out in opposition to expanding terrorism-related legal authority.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Clifton White and Selinda Guerrero organized Free Them All Fridays for months, speaking out against conditions and abuses in New Mexico prisons. White had spent years behind the walls, with Guerrero on the outside calling for prisoners’ rights. After the couple pulled together the first Black Lives Matter protest of 2020 in Albuquerque in late May, White was arrested on an administrative parole violation, which Guerrero says was retaliation for their protests. She and other demonstrators called for his release all summer long. He was returned to his family late last week. KUNM talked with the couple Monday, Nov. 2, in a park, with everyone wearing masks, which you might hear in the interview.

The Mari-Luci Jaramillo Collection / National Hispanic Cultural Center

Mon. 4/13, 8p:  On Espejos de Aztlán, we honor Dr. Mari-Luci Jaramillo´s life and contributions to New Mexico, our nation and the world.  A native of Las Vegas, New Mexico, who advocated for civil rights become the first Latina to hold a United States ambassadorship.  

CABQ GovTV

Since the coronavirus reached the U.S. after being first detected in China last year, there’s been a spike in cases of xenophobia and discrimination against Asians and Asian Americans across the nation. Albuquerque’s newest city councilor Lan Sena met with local Asian American community leaders this week to hear concerns and offer support. 

Courtesy of VCINM

When a hospital or doctor’s office sees a patient who doesn’t speak English, federal law requires the institution to hire an interpreter. But the need for professional language services in New Mexico far exceeds the supply. An Albuquerque organization, Valley Community Interpreters (VCI), is hoping to change that.

516 Arts

 


Americans are deeply divided over how to handle immigration and an art exhibit in Albuquerque is working to bring new perspectives into the conversation.

Kids Making History

Feb 21, 2018
Courtesy of Casey Smith

The Children's Hour Sat 2/24 9a: History is being made every day, and kids are part of the story. 14 year old Donovan Smith, an unsung hero of black history himself, will tell us about his latest efforts in making Albuquerque a better place to live. Plus, we’re hearing about kids leading the way in Florida and around the world to make schools safer, but this isn’t the first time kids have been on the front lines for their rights. 

Photo by of Cecil J. Williams, and used with his gracious permission

The Children's Hour Sat 2/10 9a: We’ll continue our celebration of Black History with the story of an unsung hero, Cecil J. Williams, who as a teenage photographer documented some of the most momentous events of the Civil Rights Movement. His iconic photographs told the story of the movement in ways words couldn’t capture. Plus, it’s Valentine’s Day next week and we’ll find out how one Albuquerque family takes the holiday to a whole new level. And find out about the DaVinci exhibit at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. 

Wiki, Creative Commons

The Children's Hour, 2/3 Sat 9a: February is Black History Month, and we'll talk about the unique history black Americans have in our country, and find out about some unsung heroes in the struggle for civil rights, including the story of a brave 15 year old girl named Claudette Colvin. 

publicdomainpictures.net via CC

The day after Donald Trump is inaugurated as the United States’ 45th president, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to flood in from around the country to march through the nation’s capital. The mission of the Women’s March includes advocating for human rights and pushing back against bigotry toward immigrants, Muslims and people of color. 

DOJ Conducts Criminal Probe Of APD's Mary Hawkes Shooting

Jan 19, 2017
Tony Webster via Flickr / Creative Commons

The U.S. Department of Justice is conducting a criminal investigation of a shooting by a former Albuquerque police officer. That’s according to a member of the agency that does civilian oversight of APD.  

Dr. William Barber II

Jul 20, 2015
NM Voices For Children / NMVoices.org

Sun. 7/19 7pm:  Reverend Dr. Barber’s keynote speech at the New Mexico Voices for Children: Kids Count conference that took place on June 29. Reverend Dr. Barber’s powerful speech touches on issues of equality as well as on what it means to speak up for the youth.

MDC Chief Phillip Greer

The Bernalillo County jail’s chief resigned more than nine months ago. Phillip Greer filled the position last month at the Metropolitan Detention Center, the 39th biggest jail in the country. Greer hails from Minnesota, where he was the executive director of corrections for three counties, and he has a background in assuring jails comply with national standards.  

Around 60 residents held signs and photos of loved ones killed by Albuquerque police last night in southwest Albuquerque. The gathering, organized by the U.S. Department of Justice, was held to give civilians the chance to speak with federal investigators about possible police misconduct that may have gone unreported.