climate change

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New Mexico is one of the fastest-warming states in the country, according to a 2016 report issued by the Union Of Concerned Scientists. In this year’s legislative session several bills addressing climate change were introduced by lawmakers. Not all of the measures were rejected. They didn’t all pass, either.  KUNM caught up with environmental reporter Laura Paskus from New Mexico PBS about the urgency of climate change problems in our state and how local elected officials are responding .

Dylan McLaughlin

What is the sound of a river in crisis? That’s what a group of artists explore in an installation opening online at the University of New Mexico Art Museum on World Water Day, March 22nd.

NASA Global Climate Change / Public Domain

As much of the country suffers from the polar vortex that has brought record lows and winter storms, legislators at the Roundhouse are examining the Climate Solutions Act. House Bill 9 looks at New Mexico’s issues with climate change while implementing economic reform in addressing the state’s energy consumption. For Your New Mexico Government’s continuing coverage of the legislative session KUNM’s Khalil Ekulona spoke with Laura Paskus from New Mexico PBS.

WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

 

On Wednesday, President Joe Biden ordered a temporary suspension of new leasing and permitting for oil and gas development on public lands. But the order will not apply to tribal lands.

University Showcase, Friday, 12/18 8a: New Mexico and the Southwest are grappling with profound impacts brought by climate change and those will only get worse, so how are we preparing? Journalist Laura Paskus has covered New Mexico’s environment for years and in her new book from University of New Mexico Press, “At The Precipice: New Mexico’s Changing Climate,” she explores the realities of climate change and the havoc it has been wreaking for years in the state.

Governors across the West are asking for federal support to ensure that wildfire restoration becomes a priority, just like wildfire suppression and mitigation efforts.

Eric J. Garcia / El Machete Illustrated

The final presidential debate of 2020 got passing marks because the candidates managed to take turns. But rarely did they roll out the kind of action plans the moderator was looking for. She kept asking: If elected, what will you do about this big problem we are facing? Still, candidates did not venture into specifics. We think that was by design. The strategy was, make debate No. 1 so bad that by the time debate No. 2 comes around, expectations are so low, everyone will just be grateful it’s not incoherent shouting and call it good. But in a time with multiple crises pressing down on us, specific plans can pull people together, provide direction and alleviate anxiety. So that’s what this episode is all about. What do you want to hear candidates talking about? What kinds of plans and policies do you wish they were outlining before the public?

Delaney Brigman


Many first time voters have a lot on their mind this election cycle. College students are coming of age in an unprecedented time, with the COVID-19 pandemic, civil uprisings for racial justice, and accelerating climate change. They're trying to figure it all out while keeping up with remote classes and assignments. As part of our Voices Behind the Vote series, UNM freshman Delaney Brigman spoke with KUNM about why voting is important to her and what young people want from their politicians. 

Laura Paskus

An overwhelming majority of scientists agree that human-caused climate change is real. And along with more heat, drought and wildfires, we are facing an increase in forced migration – people fleeing their home countries for U.S. borders when they lose their crops or conditions become unlivable. No More Normal host Khalil Ekulona spoke with environmental reporter Laura Paskus about how New Mexicans should be preparing for this future, especially when it comes to water use. She says the Albuquerque stretch of the Rio Grande is critically low and could even stop flowing this month.

Bert Benally

Let’s take a breath. In episode 12, we try to fend off that wild pandemic election news cycle we’ve been living inside of, which can feel like a deluge of disorganized tragedies and failures. And we put the focus on what’s hanging in the balance these next couple of weeks as we cast our ballots.

Leslie Granda-Hill / 2020

This week, we get into what has disappeared from our lives—good or bad—during the pandemic. Episode 2 is all about what’s going, going, gone, maybe for good. We learn of attempts to erase people from the Census. We talk to Sen. Martin Heinrich about the erosion of our civil liberties. We reflect on what’s fading from our relationships and mental wellness. We hear from a COVID-19 survivor, so the realities of the virus don’t slip away. We examine the consciousness of community and the loss of a collective future with an international futurist. We reflect on a disappearing chicken and what life was like pre-pandemic. And we try to see and hear a vanishing Rio Grande.

Two-thirds of Americans think the federal government should be doing more to reduce the impacts of climate change, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.


A recent study shows that humans have been living in a specific temperature "niche" for at least 6,000 years, but climate change could force billions of people to live in areas outside of the niche by 2070. That could be intolerably hot, even lethal, for many of them.  

A new study in the journal Science says that human-driven climate change is pushing the American West into a megadrought, and into its driest period in more than 400 years.

 


jacilluch via Flickr

Listen to this great conversation with Laura Paskus of New Mexico PBS, as we talk about the environmental issues that are affecting the state and the steps that lawmakers are taking to answer them. She's been covering the environment in the land of enchantment for over 15 years and is full of great insight. 

Kaveh Mowahed / KUNM

 

Lyla June Johnston is spending the first week of the legislative session in Santa Fe fasting to bring attention to climate crisis. The 30-year-old scholar, organizer and artist announced last month that she'll challenge New Mexico House Speaker Brain Egolf for his seat in the Democratic primary in June. KUNM caught up with Johnston outside the Roundhouse Thursday morning, where she's been praying and talking energy policy this week.

Best of 2019

Dec 23, 2019
The Children's Hour Inc.

The Children's Hour, 12/28 Sat 9a: We take a look back at some of our favorite clips and music from 2019. We spoke with New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, author Kwame Alexander, kids concerned about the climate, and many others. Featuring music recorded at our many live programs.

11.17.19 - Climate Stories Through Art

Nov 18, 2019

11/17 7p: This fall 516 Arts and several community partners, including artists from the University of New Mexico, collaborated to create the exhibit, Species in Peril Along the Rio Grande. This regional collaboration includes exhibits, lectures, live performance art, and more.

Tune in to hear from co-curator, Professor Subhankar Banerjee, and contributing artists, laura c. carlson, and Dylan McLaughlin. Our youth producers also share some of the local events happening in the Albuquerque area! 

Hannah Colton / KUNM


    

New Mexico politicians paid lip service this election cycle to a landmark education ruling about inequities in public schools. But no one was drawing a line between the Yazzie-Martinez case and an issue that’s had students walking out of classes this fall – climate change. Verland Coker, a 26-year-old Albuquerque school board candidate, makes that connection, calling out the hypocrisy of an education system here that relies on oil and gas money.

Planting Trees To Cool Down ABQ's South Valley

Oct 22, 2019
May Ortega | KUNM

Areas with less vegetation tend to be hotter than places with more greenery. That’s according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which also says folks can reduce high temperatures in their area by planting more trees.

Climate Strikers Demand Action

Sep 20, 2019
Bryce Dix / KUNM

Around a thousand people walked out of classrooms and workplaces in Albuquerque Friday as part of the global climate strike to call for action on climate change. KUNM caught up with the strikers at Robinson Park.

Jim Clark / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / public domain

Conservation groups are criticizing the Trump Administration’s new Endangered Species Act rules, saying they weaken the law. They’re concerned the rules will do more harm to New Mexico’s endangered and threatened species. 

Andy Swapp / Mesalands


Let’s Talk New Mexico 1/31 8a: Politicians are promising to boost the economy in New Mexico and slow our warming climate with renewable energy and green jobs. It’s being called a Green New Deal. People in New Mexico have heard talk of this before. So what's worked? What hasn't? How about our new governor, and our congressional leaders—many of whom campaigned on green jobs? What green economy promises do you want to make sure don’t die on the vine?

Global Warming Express

The Children's Hour, 1/26 Sat. 9a: What is Clean Energy? Kids from the Global Warming Express tell us why clean energy is so important.  Plus, we'll meet some of the kids who are behind the movement to ban single use plastics in Albuquerque. It's all in an hour! The Children's Hour: Saturdays, 9-10am

Megan Kamerick

  University Showcase, 12/21 8a: Climate change is not theoretical in New Mexico. It's here and already having serious impacts on our communities. Professor David Gutzler says we have no choice but to adapt and incorporate this reality into our policies statewide. 

Courtesy of StoryRiders, CenterOfSouthwestCulture.org

The Children's Hour, Sat 12/8 9a: Some Albuquerque 4th and 5th graders are riding bikes to learn literacy and cultural education through a special after school program called Story Riders. We’ll also get an update about the children who are suing the Federal Government for not doing enough to curb climate change, and violating the civil rights of children across our nation. It's all in an hour, every Saturday from 9 to 10am. 

KNME Candidate Forum

Democratic U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich won a second term last night, beating Republican Mick Rich and Libertarian Gary Johnson.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Democrat Deb Haaland won New Mexico’s race for the open First District U.S. House seat.

Exploring The Arctic

Sep 11, 2018
Copyright Jen Chavez-Miller, used with permission

The Children's Hour, 9/15 Sat 9a: What does it mean to be an explorer?  We’ll be joined by Jen Chavez Miller, a teacher who just returned from exploring Arctic Svalbard. The Arctic is experiencing unprecedented melting due to climate change. Find out how curiosity and exploration are essential tools for all kids to have a full understanding of the world.

Courtesy of Advance at UNM

 

From wildfires to heavy storms that bring flash floods, weather extremes from year-to-year that stem from climate change are impacting the region’s wildlife, according to a local scientist.

The Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research Program, based in Central New Mexico, was just awarded a multimillion-dollar grant to study the long-term effects on our environment.

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