Congress

Sharon Chischilly for the Daily Lobo

Anyone who’s been paying attention to racism and white privilege in this country knows that what happened in D.C. has been brewing a long time. There’s a lot of good research and reporting happening right now outlining what’s been missed, suppressed and ignored when it comes to the rise of extremist militias in the U.S. We get into it in episode 17.

Screenshot from YouTube video courtesy of Martin Heinrich.

Congress voted again to impeach President Trump, and law enforcement is preparing for potential violence at state capitals around the U.S. as we count down to Inauguration Day on Wednesday, Jan. 20. Martin Heinrich is now the senior senator for New Mexico, and he was one of the first lawmakers to see the mob make their way to the Capitol steps. KUNM's Khalil Ekulona caught up with the senator on Wednesday morning and asked him about the experience and what things are like in the building now.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Air Force veteran Barbara Jordan led the Black New Mexico Movement in Rio Rancho in the summer, organizing for equality and justice for Black and Brown people. Demonstrators there encountered angry pushback  from hundreds of residents at some events, but she pressed on. KUNM’s Khalil Ekulona reached out to Jordan to get her views on what she saw take place at the nation's Capitol last week, where a mob of people attempted an insurrection of the United States government—with notably less reaction from law enforcement than at BLM protests in 2020.  

Ted Eytan / Wikimedia Commons

  A lockdown was imposed at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, in response to a mob of hundreds of pro-Trump extremists who stormed the building. Freshman U.S. Rep. Teresa Leger Fernandez, who represents New Mexico’s northern third congressional district, was inside with her colleagues conducting the people’s business of certifying the electoral college results. Hours later, KUNM’s Khalil Ekulona checked in with the representative.

 

Election 2020: U.S. Senate Debate

Oct 20, 2020
New Mexico PBS

NMPBS Election Special 10/22, 8a: It’s a historic race for the U.S. Senate this year in New Mexico. Tom Udall announced in March of 2019 that he would not be running again in 2020, bringing an apparent end to a decades-long career of public service. Running to replace Senator Udall are current U.S.

U.S. Census Bureau via Flickr CC

The census is one of the more important events in our democracy. Every 10 years each person is counted so that resources can be allocated, programs created, and a general understanding of the population is had. It should be a clean process. Should be. The 2020 census has proven to be anything but clean. Mud has been thrown on the process, as people and institutions attempt to manipulate the numbers, subsequently stripping power from some and giving it to others. Peppered throughout this episode is an editorial from NoMoNo about why the census matters: The state is counting on us to be counted. If you haven't completed the census form yet, do it now. It only takes a few minutes. Click here to get started.

fronteristxs and Anonymous, Untitled

When President Trump and ICE got in on the act of separating families and locking kids in cages, it spurred a public outcry. Millions of people were appalled that the land of the free would treat people in such a manner—especially people who were counting on the United States to provide safety, as they were often fleeing life-threatening situations. As usual in this country, the news cycle changed, and a majority of the public stopped talking about it. Then COVID-19 came, and the call to release detainees has picked up again, a call to save lives, a call to treat people like humans. As the pandemic continues to dominate our lives, the threat of coronavirus spreading in detention centers became a reality. What's not real: the response from ICE and the federal government. In episode 5, we don’t just look the dire situation for the people, but ask what, if anything, can be done about it.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Episode 48 dives back into how the pandemic is affecting people experiencing homelessness. KUNM's Hannah Colton goes further into the story of the city breaking up encampments, despite the CDC advising against it during this time, and she brings us the perspective of Cypher Johnson, who's passing through Albuquerque and spending time on the streets. We talk to people who work with unsheltered folks around the state about what an outbreak at a shelter would mean for the whole community, about what needs to change right now—and what needs to change in the future. We also hear from the Albuquerque Police Department and the Las Cruces Police Department about how coronavirus has changed things for them philosophically and practically. 

Jernej Furman via Flickr CC

Episode 47 is all about this relief money folks have been promised. Where's that unemployment? That stimulus money? That small business relief? That food assistance?

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News outlets around the country are struggling to stay afloat as the pandemic debilitates businesses they depend on for ad revenue. The Santa Fe New Mexican and the Santa Fe Reporter have announced layoffs and salary cuts, and the Gallup Independent is moving its entire staff to part-time. On Monday, President Trump once again attacked the news media in a campaign-style video during a press briefing. Meanwhile, U.S. Senator Tom Udall is calling for the next federal relief package to include funding for local news outlets. 

Let's Talk Coronavirus: Three Weeks In

Apr 1, 2020
Hannah Colton / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 4/2, 8a: As we near the one-month mark of living with COVID-19 in New Mexico, we'll check in with state and federal officials to hear how they're handling the latest public health challenges. What new kinds of support do you want to see from state agencies? How will Congress' $2 trillion dollar coronavirus relief bill help our state's most vulnerable people?  How are school districts and individual teachers adapting to meet students' needs and comply with state education laws? 

LIVE: Mueller Testifies Before Congress

Jul 23, 2019
Liam James Doyle/NPR

Former special counsel Robert Mueller is appearing in two separate hearings before the House judiciary and intelligence committees. 

Liam James Doyle/NPR

After an inspector general report found "dangerous overcrowding" at Border Patrol facilities, the House oversight committee is holding a hearing about conditions for detained migrants. Watch the hearing live.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Democrat Deb Haaland won New Mexico’s race for the open First District U.S. House seat.

Marisa Demarco/KUNM

Election night saw gains for New Mexico Democrats. Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham won the governorship by a healthy margin, outpacing opponent Steve Pearce by almost 14 percentage points. Despite deep ideological divisions between the major political parties, Lujan Grisham talked unity.

NPR

Follow live results from key House, Senate, and Governors races across the country in the 2018 midterm election. We also have New Mexico election results, and NPR's live blog with the latest election results from around the country.

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DoD via CC

Congress is spending billions more than it ever has to fight the opioid epidemic affecting the nation. Some of that money is going to rural areas, and there was some concern that the rural communities being targeted were almost entirely white.

JESSICA7191 VIA PIXABAY / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

New Mexico’s been fighting the opioid epidemic for decades, but it wasn’t until last year that the federal government declared it a public health emergency. Congress just pumped up the budget for fighting the epidemic by billions, including $100 million for rural areas. But none of the rural counties in our state were targeted for that money. Now that’s changing.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Congress boosted the budget for the battle against the opioid epidemic this year, and a chunk of it—$100 million—is slated for treatment and prevention in rural communities. But something about how lawmakers chose to prioritize that money caught a New Mexico health official by surprise: the funding is focused on counties that are mostly white.

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Let's Talk New Mexico 4/26 8a: Call 277-5866. We're talking about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and whether people in our state can access it. We'll also talk about the Farm Bill proposed in Congress, which would increase work requirements for people using SNAP, along with other changes. Have you applied for SNAP? How did the process go for you? Or what do you think of work requirements for people participating in this programs? How can people in New Mexico get the food they need? Email letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet #letstalkNM or call in live during the show. 

Liam James Doyle/NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying on Capitol Hill to answer questions about protecting user data. The hearing held by the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees follows news that the data-mining and political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica obtained personal information of up to 87 million Facebook users. The firm is accused of using that information to target Facebook users with political advertising in 2016. The two Senate committees are holding a joint hearing called "Facebook, Social Media Privacy, and the Use and Abuse of Data."

Marisa Demarco

A short-term federal budget is set to expire at midnight on Thursday, and there could be another government shutdown. Some lawmakers in D.C. refused to support the budget bill if protections for young people who were brought to the U.S. as children were not included. Here in Albuquerque, college professors, Dreamers and allies gathered outside the Downtown offices for Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich to demand that they fight for a Dream Act in Congress.

Official photo via Wikimedia Commons

Massachusetts Rep. Joe Kennedy III, seen as a rising political star with a famous last name, will deliver the Democratic response to President Trump's State of the Union. 

Watch The State Of The Union

Jan 30, 2018
Office of the Speaker via Wikimedia Commons

Watch President Trump's State of the Union speech below. NPR staff are annotating the President's remarks.

State Of The Union: Annotated By NPR

Jan 30, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address to Congress, which will be followed by a response from the Democratic Party. Journalists across the NPR newsroom will be annotating those remarks, adding fact-checks and analysis in real time. Coverage will start at 7pm. 

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DACA Supporters Rally In Albuquerque

Jan 19, 2018
Sarah Trujillo via KUNM

Folks gathered this afternoon in downtown Albuquerque to urge Congress to continue protections for people who were brought to the U.S. as children illegally.

State May Need Millions To Save Health Care For Kids

Dec 20, 2017
Pixabay via Creative Commons

The Childrens Health Insurance Program covers over 9 million kids nationally, but the well of federal funds has been dry for months, and with strife in Congress, uncertainty lingers.

Federal Communications Commission via CC

The Federal Communications Commission is scheduled to vote on rolling back net neutrality protections and to weigh media ownership rules again on Thursday, Dec. 14. Surveys show the changes are not supported by people across the country, regardless of political party. KUNM spoke with Viki Harrison, the executive director of Common Cause New Mexico, about what these policy shifts could mean in New Mexico.

Concealed Carry Reciprocity Bill Gets Mixed Review

Oct 27, 2017
zaphad1 via Flickr / Creative Commons License

New Mexico’s Attorney General Hector Balderas weighed in this week against a proposed concealed carry bill that’s before Congress. But some local gun owners said the bill would make it easier for them to defend themselves while traveling.

The Congressional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act would have states recognize out-of-state concealed carry permits as they do drivers licenses. A person with a concealed carry license traveling to another state would have to obey that state’s gun laws.

Tumiso via Pixabay / Creative Commons License

Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act died in Congress last week – at least for now. But local insurance carriers are still struggling with a lot of unknowns under President Trump.

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