education

Courtesy of Dine College

President Biden has laid out his vision for the future of public education, which includes a nationwide community college tuition waiver for all Americans who want to take advantage.

That waiver would be especially impactful in states with the lowest levels of higher education attainment, including several in the Mountain West. In Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming and New Mexico, fewer than 30% of adults over 25 have a bachelor's degree.

Mr.TinDC / Flickr

 

For 109 years since the Legislature was founded, New Mexico has not had an African American State Senator. In 2021, that changed when Harold Pope Jr. of Albuquerque took his seat representing the 23rd District. KUNM caught up with the freshman Senator and Air Force veteran to ask about what motivated a life of service and where he sees New Mexico's future.

C-SPAN/ C-SPAN.org

 

U.S. Representative for New Mexico Deb Haaland faced questioning this week during her confirmation hearing for secretary of the interior. While questions ranged from her stance on climate to whether she supported fossil fuel development, Senator Martin Heinrich included questions on the outdoor recreation economy and what improvements need to be made to education on tribal lands. 

Nash Jones / KUNM

As New Mexico schools got the go-ahead last month from Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham to resume partial in-person teaching beginning Feb. 8, revised re-entry plans have come before districts for debate. The Albuquerque Public Schools Board of Education on Wednesday, Feb. 3, postponed a decision about students going back to the classroom after several hours of discussion. Prior to the board meeting, protesters gathered outside the district's headquarters.

Element5 Digital via Unsplash / Creative Commons

State lawmakers kicked off the 2021 New Mexico legislative session Tuesday, Jan. 19. KUNM’s Nash Jones spoke with James Barron, education reporter with the Santa Fe New Mexican, to help get the lay of the land.

Barron says that education is likely to be a key issue in this year’s session as New Mexico works to meet mandates set out by the 2018 Yazzie/Martinez ruling, which determined the state had failed to provide a sufficient education to certain students, including those who are Native American, English Language Learners, or from families with low incomes. Barron says there are a number of resolutions up for discussion.

KUNM / Creative Commons

This week, New Mexico voters blew past turnout records of years past, and pushed the state Senate further to the left. That means that in the next legislative session, some policies and plans might be on the table that weren’t before. KUNM's Megan Kamerick spoke with Marjorie Childress, who wrote about the progressive shift for New Mexico In Depth.

Elliotte Cook

Albuquerque lost an influential anti-racism activist and educator this summer. Bahati Myhelatu Ansari died from lymphocytic leukemia at 72 years old on June 27, 2020. She was the founder of the “Racism Free Zone” program for schools, which she started in Oregon about 30 years ago after her sons experienced racist attacks in junior high school. KUNM's Yasmin Khan met up with Ansari’s son Elliotte Cook at his mother’s favorite spot in Albuquerque, Tingley Beach, to talk about his mother and her legacy.

For days now, wildfire smoke has degraded the air quality in much of the Mountain West, and that unhealthy air is forcing tough decisions for schools that are trying to reopen.

 


pxfuel.com / Creative Commons

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/27 8a: School is back in session online, with some districts planning to stay that way all semester and others waiting to see whether it's safe to go back in person later this fall. On this week’s call-in show, we’ll center the thoughts and experiences of New Mexico students as they kick off this unconventional semester. And we want to hear from you!

Photo by Nani Chacon

In the old days—like last year—mid-August was a time when students prepared to get back to class. A time to reconnect with friends and compare summer vacation stories and to show off the fashion of your new school outfits, if you were so lucky. In 2020, instead of students worrying about who has a crush on who, they’re thinking about who has COVID and who doesn't. Parents are concerned with how their kids will get a quality education. Teachers are not only focused on the adjustment to teaching remotely but on the health risks of being called back to campus. In Episode 6, we hear from a panel of teachers, students in three different levels of school, a union rep for college instructors, Khalil’s mom Olufemi Ekulona, as well as renowned anti-racism educator Jane Elliott. Break out your notebooks. There’s a lot to learn, and what is covered today will be on the exam.

Pixelmaniac Pictures via Wikimedia Commons CC


We come back to life’s essentials like housing and education in episode 80, and the systemic problems that can easily slip past us if we’re not vigilant. As we continue to endure, it's easy to drop the ball on issues New Mexico has been battling for years. Today we hear from journalists from around the state on how the pandemic is affecting schools and teachers, the affordability of housing, and whether the corrections system is fulfilling its human rights obligations. 

A little boy in an orange shirt walks up to a grab-and-go meal site at an elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah. A school worker wearing a mask uses a bullhorn to let kitchen staff know the boy's there. Then a staffer sets a bag lunch and some extra strawberries on a table and backs away.

 


Weixiang Ng via Flickr

The COVID-19 pandemic has cancelled in-person classes for universities and public schools in New Mexico, including crucial hands-on learning for nursing students in hospitals. That leaves future nurses feeling ill-prepared to take on the responsibilities of nursing after graduation.

Moyan Brenn via Wikimedia Commons CC

In episode 28, we talk to parents about what it's like to become the primary educators of their kids—and to be at home with them pretty much around the clock. And Amy Biehl High School Counselor Kathleen Moore offers wisdom and tips on working with your teen in this new world. 

Arianna Sena / KUNM

The 2020 legislative session is over. Gene Grant, host of New Mexico In Focus, recaps the biggest moments and topics, like the red-flag law (which passed), recreational marijuana (which didn't), free college tuition (partially funded) and more.

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This podcast is part of the project: Your N.M. Government. Funding for our legislative coverage is provided, in part, by the Thornburg Foundation, the New Mexico Local News Fund and KUNM listeners. 

Max Klingensmith via Flickr, flickr.com/photos/mklingo/2809961438/in/gallery-124094550@N02-72157644454110463/ / Creative Commons BY 2.0: creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

New Mexico lawmakers are continuing to respond to widespread disparities in public schools based on race, class, ability and more. There’s a proposal to address inequity by setting up a plan and a new state commission. But advocates say the bill isn’t exactly what students need in the now.

rpclod via Wikimedia / Creative Commons License


  Let's Talk New Mexico 1/16 8a: We’re going to look back at the local news stories that affected New Mexicans last year and at how they might develop in the year ahead. And we’re going to talk about how these topics will impact the upcoming legislative session. Our guests will walk us through their picks for the most notable, important or interesting news stories they covered in 2019—from immigration to liver transplants to education—and how it made a difference to the people who live in our state.

 

And we want to hear from you! What New Mexico news stories stood out for you in 2019? Or what national events affected your life? Email Letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet us at #LetsTalkNM, or call in live during the show.

 

The Children’s Hour 1/11 Sat 9a: What is Anthropology, and how does understanding human evolutionary history help us understand people today?

The Children’s Hour celebrates a year on the road exploring what makes us human at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico to open the Passport to People Family Program. The Children's Hour will broadcast live from 9 – 10 am, with anthropologists of the Maxwell Museum answering all questions human related.  Doors open at 8:30, free and open to all. Parking is free along Redondo Drive and surface lots north and south of the Maxwell. 

Best of 2019

Dec 23, 2019
The Children's Hour Inc.

The Children's Hour, 12/28 Sat 9a: We take a look back at some of our favorite clips and music from 2019. We spoke with New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, author Kwame Alexander, kids concerned about the climate, and many others. Featuring music recorded at our many live programs.

Earthquakes & Volcanoes

Nov 26, 2019
Photo by, Kevin Sebold / Wiki, Creative Commons

The Children's Hour 11/30 Sat 9a: It's not earth shattering information that earthquakes and volcanoes are among the most destructive events on our planet. Join us for an exploration of the science behind them with Dr. Mousumi Roy professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of New Mexico with a special interest in earth science. 

Katie Stone

The Children's Hour 11/23 Sat 9a: You're invited to join us for a live broadcast from the opening of the Jim Henson exhibit at the Albuquerque Museum in Old Town Albuquerque. The kids will interview Cheryl Henson, Jim’s daughter about growing up on Sesame Street. With live music from KUNM’s own Allison Davis and Friends, local puppeteer Loren Kahn, and you!  Doors open at 8:30am at the Albuquerque Museum at 2000 Mountain Road NW in Old Town Albuquerque. 

Katie Stone / ChildrensHour.org

The Children's Hour 11/16 Sat 9a: How can we unlock family stories through songs? Musician and educator Michael Napolitano from Michael and the Rockness Monsters gives us tips on how to learn your family history through music at your holiday tables.  Then, second graders in Ms. Antillon's classroom in downtown Albuquerque's Coronado Elementary School teach us about the legendary Mexican painter, Frida Kahlo. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Voter turnout was high around the state on Tuesday, Nov. 5, as people cast ballots for their local leaders. In Albuquerque, even though there were contested City Council races, some folks said they mostly went to the polls to weigh in on bonds and taxes for public education. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The 10-year census count will begin next year. But there’s plenty about it that might make some folks nervous in New Mexico. Just last week, the Census Bureau asked the state for access to citizenship data through driver’s license info. The state said no, it wouldn’t turn over the records. A local policy group says these tactics should not stop folks here from participating in the census.

KUNM

The Albuquerque Public School board members control a massive budget and policies affecting more than 80,000 students. Three seats are up for election this fall, and KUNM invited candidates on to a live radio show on Oct. 24 to ask what they hope to do about longstanding disparities related to race, language access, class and disability. 

courtesy of Kimberlee Hanson / GBCS

Gordon Bernell Charter School fills a gap in New Mexico’s education system, helping adults in jail or who have previously been incarcerated to build the skills they need to finish high school. The school’s future is uncertain after the state Legislature this year banned schools from claiming Public Education Department funding for students over age 21. Leaders at the school went before lawmakers this week to ask for a stable funding source.

Death And Grief

Oct 24, 2019
Vanessa Vassar

The Children’s Hour, 10/26 Sat 9a: This week, we explore how kids cope with death and grief. Our Kids Crew interview our friends from the Children’s Grief Center of New Mexico, children’s book Evan & The Skygoats author Vanessa Vassar,  and death educator Gail Rubin. Plus we hear from Sage and Sky about the death their beloved dog, Sumi. We'll learn what are the best things to say to someone in mourning, and what we absolutely should never say. Find out the history of Halloween and Day of the Dead, and how you can memorialize someone you love.

Let's Talk Equity With APS Board Candidates

Oct 21, 2019
Hannah Colton / KUNM

Let’s Talk NM 10/24 8a: Members of the Albuquerque Public Schools board control a massive budget and policies affecting more than 80,000 students. Plus, they’ll hire the next superintendent. On Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’ll have the APS board candidates in studio, and we want your questions for them. What inequities do you see in Albuquerque schools? What should district leadership do about disparities related to race, language access, class and ability?

Full-Time And Temporary UNM Faculty Unionize

Oct 18, 2019
Hannah Colton / KUNM

University of New Mexico faculty voted to unionize this week, which means labor relations in the future will be negotiated through two separate collective bargaining units. The win for the United Academics of UNM (UA-UNM) comes after years of organizing by faculty who say they want fair compensation and better working conditions.

Archaeology Day

Oct 15, 2019
Katie Stone

The Children's Hour 10/19 Sat 9a: We’re broadcasting live from the Center for New Mexico Archaeology in Santa Fe to celebrate International Archaeology Day on the only day each year that their doors are open to the public.  The Kids Crew will talk with scientists from the Center,  including anthropologists working in the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture’s Laboratory of Anthropology,   about what they do, and how the more than 8 million artifacts in the Center are used and preserved. Featuring archaeologist and musical guest, Marlon Magdalena from the Jemez Historic Site and Pueblo

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