KUNM

Election Day

May Ortega | KUNM

Libertarians in New Mexico didn’t do so well this election. None of the five candidates running for office here won their races.

But Senate candidate Gary Johnson is still optimistic.

Element5 Digital via Unsplash / Unsplash License

Are you trying to figure out how to get to the polls on Tuesday?

Some ride-sharing companies, cities and local political parties are offering free or discounted rides to polling stations on Election Day.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Jonathan Sakura looked at the spot where his car was parked outside his home a couple nights ago when someone smashed the rear window and grabbed his girlfriend’s bag. "It’s a bummer. It’s violating," he said. "You know, this is our property. This is our stuff. And somebody taking something that doesn’t belong to them— it’s kinda disheartening, and morale drops a little bit."

May Ortega | KUNM

 

Immigration is one of this election’s biggest issues.

Tammy WilkersonHill-Fisher teaches English as a second language with the Immigrant and Refugee Resource Village of Albuquerque, and that's definitely one of her biggest political drivers.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

Gun control is an issue driving at least one local to the polls and to an Albuquerque gun show.

Sebastian Pociecha via Unsplash / Unsplash License

 

Next month will see the first general election since the Las Vegas and Stoneman Douglas shootings. And New Mexico had a school shooting of its own in Aztec last December.

Courtesy Bernalillo County

 

Voters in Bernalillo County will see another bond question about a planned tiny home village for people experiencing homelessness on their ballots come November.

May Ortega | KUNM

Bob Moyer wasn’t thrilled about the slim pickings on the Republican side. Nine of the state’s 12 major races have a single Republican candidate running unopposed. His concerns about public safety drove him to the polls.

Keller And Lewis Faceoff For ABQ Mayor

Oct 4, 2017
Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Voters whittled the eight-candidate ballot for mayor down to just two contenders: state Auditor Tim Keller and Westside City Councilor Dan Lewis. About 97,000 people voted in Albuquerque’s election on Tuesday, Oct. 3, and that’s significantly more ballots than the dismal citywide election four years ago.  "Today citizens of our city came out to vote like they haven’t in a long time," Keller told a crowd of supporters.