housing

Elliot Alderson / Pixabay

As the COVID-19 pandemic stretches on, New Mexico's homeless population has been on the rise and has been for quite some time. Additionally, many families are struggling to make ends meet in this time of uncertainty. 

Mayor Tim Keller and the City of Albuquerque have launched a new free public service program that aims to help residents access the city's resources for rental assistance, housing, and managing other financial needs. 

Evictions have cascading effects, and researchers have found they could be fatal during the COVID-19 pandemic. A new study draws the connection between a lack of stable housing and an increase in COVID-19 cases and deaths.

Tom.Arthur via Flickr / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

Millions of Americans face losing their homes after the federal moratorium on evictions expired last month, and Congress adjourned this week without passing a new one. President Trump signed an executive order this week addressing evictions, but housing experts say it provides no real protection for most tenants. New Mexico’s moratorium on evictions is still in effect, but as University of New Mexico law professor Serge Martinez tells KUNM’s Megan Kamerick, it doesn’t apply to every situation.

Elise Dantzler has been working in restaurants since she was 15. But, like many in her industry, she was laid off due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That forced the 25-year-old Coloradan to rethink her living situation.

Millions of renters nationwide are at risk of eviction, and new data out of Nevada offers a sense of just how urgent the situation is as Congress debates another COVID-19 relief bill.

After 27 months of continual decline, the number of Americans falling behind on their mortgage payments is on the rise.

As employers continue to lay off workers at unprecedented levels, every state in the Mountain West has some kind of rent assistance program in place. Low-income housing advocates hope those programs, and their funding, can keep up with the ongoing need.

Let's Talk Housing And Homelessness

Jan 19, 2020
"Hungry" by Jeremy Brooks is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

  Let's Talk NM 1/23 8a: New Mexico has seen a dramatic increase in the number of people experiencing homelessness, according to a 2019 report to the US Congress. On this week's show, we’ll discuss homelessness and what our state and local governments should be doing to help.

Tiny Home Village Finalizes ABQ Location

Jun 27, 2019
Courtesy Bernalillo County

 

A village of tiny homes for folks experiencing homelessness in Bernalillo County has officially nailed down a location. 

May Ortega | KUNM / KUNM Radio

Having a lot of abandoned or foreclosed homes in your community can hurt morale and drag down property values. A group of neighborhood associations in Southeast Albuquerque are taking things into their own hands.

Let's Talk Ideas For Ending Homelessness

Feb 7, 2019
Thomas Quine via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 2/14 8a: Many people across New Mexico experience homelessness or housing insecurity. We'll look at how local governments and other organizations are working to help those folks get back home. There are immediate needs for some people, but what about long-term solutions? What are the most effective ways to help people get housing? Have you experienced homelessness? What worked best for you? Email LetsTalk@kunm.org, tweet us using the #LetsTalkNM hashtag, or call in live during the show.

Westside ABQ Shelter Opening Early

Nov 12, 2018
Courtesy Heading Home NM

 

The city of Albuquerque has opened one of its emergency shelters early.

Temperatures will go down to the teens in Albuquerque tonight, according to the National Weather Service, and remain in the 20s overnight for the rest of the week.

BernCo Voters To Decide On More Tiny Home Money

Aug 24, 2018
Courtesy Bernalillo County

 

Voters in Bernalillo County will see another bond question about a planned tiny home village for people experiencing homelessness on their ballots come November.

Let's Talk Affordable Housing

Jun 19, 2018
Steve Mundinger / Wikimedia Commons

Let's Talk New Mexico 6/21 8a: Many New Mexicans don’t make enough money to comfortably pay rent or a mortgage, even while working a full-time job. What’s the housing situation for middle-to-low-income people in New Mexico? What’s being done to address a lack of affordable housing? We want to hear from you! Email LetsTalk@KUNM.org, tweet #LetsTalkNM or call in live during the show.

Bill Would Fund Human Trafficking Task Force

Feb 1, 2018
Arianna Sena / Creative Commons


Human trafficking has increased in New Mexico over the last 5 years, with at least 144 reported cases, according to the National Human Trafficking Hotline.

 

Las Cruces Democratic Representative Angelica Rubio introduced a bill that would fund research on human trafficking.

Tax Benefits Proposal For Santolina Provokes Critique

Jul 29, 2016

Tax subsidies are often used as a kind of sweet carrot to incentivize developers to invest in abandoned or run down parts of cities, bringing resources where they wouldn’t go otherwise.

But critics of Santolina, a proposed 22 square mile housing development west of Albuquerque, say these subsidies shouldn’t be used for sprawling new suburban communities.

Victoria Edwards/KUNM

Some developers who build huge housing projects say it’s common sense to ask the community share in the cost of paying for public infrastructure.

Low-Income, High Rent: Getting By In Santa Fe

May 9, 2016
Ed Williams

Living in Santa Fe has gotten more and more expensive over the years. Today, home prices in New Mexico’s capital city are higher than almost anywhere else in the state. So, what happens when people don’t earn enough to make it there?

andre dos santos via Flickr / Creative Commons License

A Harvard University report released last week shows that for renters making less money, Albuquerque is among the toughest U.S. cities for affordable housing.

Santolina: Smart Growth Or Public Health Risk?

May 5, 2015
Mike Tungate via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 5/7 8a: 

Bernalillo County commissioners are considering a residential development plan to build almost 40,000 new homes west of Albuquerque. Developers say it’s a smart, efficient way to plan for population growth and boost the local economy—but critics say it will hurt public health and burden dwindling water supplies. We’ll talk with Santolina’s planning team, public health researchers and South Valley farmers. 

Thomas Quine via Flickr / Creative Commons License

  

The city of Albuquerque will award over $2 million in contracts to five local nonprofits to fund mental health, homelessness and hunger programs. 

Half a million dollars of the city’s funding will pay for housing programs run by Health Care For the Homeless and the Supportive Housing Coalition. Anita Córdova is with Healthcare for the Homeless.

Pueblo Of Zuni Breaks Ground On New Housing

May 9, 2013
USDA Rural Development New Mexico

In what's thought to be the first housing program of it's kind brought to a tribal community, the Pueblo of Zuni in western New Mexico has broken ground on a series of homes financed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


The "Self-help housing" program works like this: the USDA gives your community a grant to finance housing, delivers supplies to build a home, provides blue prints, then - with the help of technical volunteers - oversees community members build their own homes.