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Courtesy of the City of Albuquerque

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/16 8a: Did you know that you can check out cake pans, WiFi hotspots and ukuleles from Albuquerque Public Libraries? You can skip expensive gym bills and work out for free—lift weights, get on a cardio machine—at some community centers. What do you know about that's free? What free resources do you find useful? What do you wish was offered for free? Email LetsTalk@kunm.org, tweet with #LetsTalkNM or call in live during the show. 

Libreshot via CC

Horrifying and fatal cases of child abuse and neglect are pervasive in New Mexico. People here are asking the question: How do we stop this? Nationally, evidence is showing that prevention is the key.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Seven red states filed a lawsuit in May arguing that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, or DACA, is unconstitutional because Congress never voted on it. A District Court judge in Texas will hear arguments on Wednesday, Aug. 8, about whether to issue an emergency halt to DACA.

Freeabqimages.com

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/9 8a: Call now 505-277-5866. One way to help make cities more affordable and accessible is to increase density. If housing is close to businesses, schools and entertainment, people can utilize public transportation and take advantage of new amenities. But some neighborhood leaders in Albuquerque worry that new development in the city may push out existing residents. How can we balance both needs? We'd like to hear from you! Email LetsTalk@kunm.org, tweet with #LetsTalkNM, or call in live during the show. 

Between growing populations and changing climate conditions, our water sources are only expected to get more crunched. Communities in some very dry states have had to get creative about where to get their water, sometimes purifying sewage into drinking water. More western cities are beginning to get on board, too. But there’s a problem: the ick factor.

Jose Alvarez, a supervisor at R. H. Dupper Landscaping, stood up from changing a sprinkler nozzle on a large grassy field at a homeowner’s association in Chandler, Arizona. He surveyed the turf, a patchwork of green and brown.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/2 8a: Research shows that learning about one's own history and culture can keep students engaged and lead to better educational outcomes. A recent court ruling found New Mexico's Public Education Department is failing its Native American students, in part by not providing adequate culturally relevant materials. Did you have access to Native American Studies or classes taught in your Native language?

In The Desert City Of Tucson, The Grass Is Not Greener

Aug 1, 2018

Tucson, Arizona used to be a city of lawns. Patches of Bermuda grass lined residential neighborhoods, kept green — even in blazing summer months — with diligent watering. Over the decades, that has changed. Tucsonans eschew lush lawns for landscaping that is more in tune with the city's desert setting — though that doesn't necessarily mean there's no green.

An Ode To The Toilet, A Water Conservation Champ

Jul 31, 2018

Throughout the Western U.S., water conservation is in the toilet.

And that’s a good thing.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

People detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement around the country describe harsh conditions and even abuse inside facilities. Transgender women seeking asylum in the United States are often held by ICE in a separate pod at a detention center near Grants, New Mexico. On Friday, July 27, advocates saw a small victory when some women were released.

It's dress rehearsal at the Santa Fe Opera and Tina Cordova is waiting for her cue.

"There is not a single one of us onstage that isn't either a cancer patient, dealing with a tumor or a cancer," she says.

Cordova and the others preparing to take the stage are from southern New Mexico. They're downwinders — the people who lived near the first nuclear explosion and their descendants.

Many people living in the area weren't warned before they saw the flash of the 1945 atomic bomb tested as part of the Manhattan Project.


Brooks Kelly stopped at a display of smart sprinkler-system controllers.

"This 6-station timer — it's got a rebate," said Kelly, who works the plumbing aisle at the St. George Home Depot. "You buy it [and the] Washington County water district gives a $99 credit to your water bill. So, this is free."

UNM via Flickr / Creative Commons License

It’s been a little over a week since University of New Mexico regents voted to eliminate 4 sports programs, despite numerous passionate objections from around the campus and the city.

The men’s soccer program was one of the cuts, but Coach Jeremy Fishbein is holding onto hope that the reaction in the community, and among some state lawmakers, might signal that all is not lost.

Elizabeth Lee in Santa Fe


Santa Fe emergency management officials are bracing for another big thunderstorm Thursday just days after 2 to 3 inches of rain fell in a monster storm on Monday.

Eric Norris via Flickr / Creative Commons

There are about 1.7 million opioid prescriptions written every year in New Mexico. The state still has a problem with opioid related deaths, but the numbers are slowly going down here even as they rise around the country.

Melorie Begay

Life for a farmer revolves around the changing of the season, but one Albuquerque farmer’s developed an even deeper relationship with the cycle. 

Celia Raney/KUNM

More than two inches of rain fell across Santa Fe in just hours Monday night. That’s almost 15 percent of New Mexico’s annual rainfall. During storms like this roads can be just as dangerous as arroyos.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 7/26 8a: A new chapter in the fight over educational equity in New Mexico has begun. On July 20, 2018, a judge ruled that the state has violated the rights of at-risk students by failing to provide an adequate education. We'll speak with advocates and lawmakers about what the landmark decision means. What does an adequate education mean to you? And how can the state provide it to all students? 

Melorie Begay

For some people, eating and planting fresh food is about more than just filling empty stomachs, it’s a way to find connection and build community. It can get expensive, but some organizers in Southeast Albuquerque are committed to making fresh local organic food available.

Pays Imaginaire via Flickr / Creative Commons License

We’re proud to announce that KUNM won several national awards for our 2017 coverage. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Sometimes people who've experienced hardship are in a unique position to know what other folks in trouble need. That’s Marion Goodluck.

Every day, weekends, in the middle of the night—she thinks about and plans for the American Indian Women’s Center. It doesn’t exist yet, but she knows from her own lived experience that Albuquerque needs a domestic violence shelter made by and for indigenous people. Her organization is hoping to secure funding from the city and state for an all-nations center that’s welcoming, that feels like a home and a site for healing. 

DoD via CC

Congress is spending billions more than it ever has to fight the opioid epidemic affecting the nation. Some of that money is going to rural areas, and there was some concern that the rural communities being targeted were almost entirely white.

Cm0rris0n

There are only 114 Mexican gray wolves in the wild in the U.S. and conservationists say inbreeeding is stifling their survival. Activist groups want the federal government to release more captive adult wolves into the wild.

Wikimedia Commons

Kirtland Air Force Base and the New Mexico Environment Department will meet with the public for an upadate on efforts to clean up the decades old fuel spill on Thursday in Albuquerque. 

West Midlands Police via Twitter / Creative Commons License

New evidence has shattered the widely believed narrative of how 10-year-old Victoria Martens was killed in Albuquerque. Right after her death in 2016, detectives interviewed her mother Michelle, and based on that, they pinned the homicide on her and two other adults. But two years later, the District Attorney says that story is false, and DNA evidence points to another killer, who’s still out there.

innov8social via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 7/12 8a: Adults aren’t the only ones looking for jobs in New Mexico. Many teens are seeking employment, both in the summer and during the school year. Teens not only need to gain crucial job skills and experience but they may be helping contribute to the immediate financial needs of their families. New Mexico’s youth unemployment rate has ranked among the highest in the nation in recent years.

  • Did you work as a teen? What did you learn from that experience?

Courtesy of Chris Moore

A South Valley business owner got an early wake up call from the Bernalillo County Sheriff’s office this weekend. A car ran into three storefronts, and he says the repairs will cost thousands. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

People around the state are used to seeing the flows in local rivers fluctuate. But this year, sandbars have started to widen and connect, and riverbanks are growing by yards. In some places down South, it’s completely dry for miles. KUNM caught up with journalist Laura Paskus of the New Mexico Political Report in a dry patch of the Rio Grande on Thursday morning. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

UPDATE: The Office of the Medical Investigator determined that the bones construction workers found are ancient and not related to the gravesite discovered in 2009.

More Than Balloons: Let's Talk Festivals in New Mexico

Jun 26, 2018
Courtsey of Angela Wilson Photography and the Lavender in the Valley Festival

Let's Talk New Mexico 6/29 8a: When the weekend rolls around, New Mexicans have many options for entertainment and fun. Festivals offer up an opportunity to break out of the weekend monotony of movies and restaurants. Fermented foods, lavender, Greek culture, and of course hot air balloons are just a few items on the New Mexico festival menu. 

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