KUNM

maternal health

pixnpics via Flickr, cropped / Creative Commons License


The New Mexico Department of Health has missed its mark for early childhood health services and needs to create a whole new strategy to improve health outcomes. That’s according to a new report from the state Legislative Finance Committee.

Courtesy UNM Midwives

 

Research has shown that newborns have healthier birth weights when their mothers receive proper prenatal care and that stress can contribute to early deliveries.

The University of New Mexico Hospital's CenteringPregnancy program for expecting mothers focuses on the social aspects of maternal health.

 

Kelly Gallagher, the head of the hospital’s Midwifery Division, is in charge of the program.

Creative Commons / Pixabay


The number of babies born dependent on drugs in New Mexico more than tripled between 2008 and 2017 according to new data from the state Department of Health.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

When pregnant women experience discrimination and stress, their babies do, too. This could help explain disturbing racial inequities in maternal and infant health here.

Salim Fadhley / Creative Commons

Let's Talk New Mexico 5/3 8a: Having a baby is a dangerous prospect for many women in New Mexico. Many hospitals aren’t prepared to deal with life-threatening complications related to pregnancy and childbirth, and not all women have access to quality prenatal care. Women of color are especially at risk. How can we ensure that all new and expectant mothers in our state get the care they need?