naloxone

Soberconnections via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0, creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

As overdose deaths in New Mexico have surged during the pandemic, recent research shows a searing gap in treatment available for Opioid Use Disorder at the state’s hospitals. One of the study’s authors, Dr. Eileen Barrett, Director of Continuing Medical Education at the University of New Mexico, spoke with KUNM about the status of opioid use and treatment in the state.

VCU Capital News Service via Flickr / Creative Commons License


Hundreds of New Mexicans die from opioid overdoses every year. A new law went into effect this summer that requires patients who are getting prescriptions for five days or more of opioids to be given the overdose-reversing medication naloxone as well. 

Jeff Anderson via Flickr / Creative Commons License

An overdose-reversing medication has become an important tool in preventing opioid deaths. But it’s not as available in Albuquerque as it is in other parts of the state, according to a team of students at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, who released their findings earlier this month.

San Juan County Joins Opioid Lawsuit

Jun 4, 2018
Rae Allen via Flickr.com / Creative Commons License

 

San Juan County is joining a lawsuit against opioid companies to get back the money it’s spent on combating the opioid crisis there.

Independent Pharmacies Stock Naloxone

Apr 5, 2016
Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Ads raising awareness about the overdose-reversing drug naloxone will be appearing on the sides of buses around Albuquerque. It’s available over-the-counter now—but only at pharmacies willing to carry the medication.

Physician Sponsors Naloxone Legislation

Feb 23, 2016
wikimedia via CC

New Mexico has one of the highest overdose death rates in the country, and recent spikes in the state’s numbers have been linked to the abuse of prescription opiates. But a drug that reverses overdoses is about to become more widely available.

Overdose-Reversing Drug Saves Hundreds In N.M.

Jan 12, 2015
PunchingJudy via flickr CC

A drug called naloxone reversed more than 700 overdoses in New Mexico last year. But hurdles remain for making the drug more widely available. 

Naloxone—brand name Narcan—can be prescribed by pharmacists, not just doctors, and Medicaid covers the cost. In 2014, those big policy changes resulted in a spike of overdose reversals. 

Overdose Drug Covered by Medicaid

Jun 19, 2014
PunchingJudy via Creative Commons

  New Mexico has the second-highest rate of overdose deaths in the country, according to the CDC. Now, a life-saving drug called naloxone is not only available by prescription, the cost of it is covered through Medicaid.