#nmleg

Cannabis Tours via Wikimedia / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

 


Let's Talk New Mexico 4/08 8am: Last week in a special session of the New Mexico Legislature lawmakers moved to legalize recreational cannabis and Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham is expected to sign the legislation. The changes allows individuals to grow for personal use or to sell with a micro-business license and they create a structure that will gradually increase taxes over time. A separate bill allows for the expungement of criminal records for some past marijuana offenses.

 

On the next Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’ll look at what the legislation contains, how it structures legalization and the timeline.

Element5 Digital via Unsplash / Creative Commons

State lawmakers kicked off the 2021 New Mexico legislative session Tuesday, Jan. 19. KUNM’s Nash Jones spoke with James Barron, education reporter with the Santa Fe New Mexican, to help get the lay of the land.

Barron says that education is likely to be a key issue in this year’s session as New Mexico works to meet mandates set out by the 2018 Yazzie/Martinez ruling, which determined the state had failed to provide a sufficient education to certain students, including those who are Native American, English Language Learners, or from families with low incomes. Barron says there are a number of resolutions up for discussion.

CUNY Mapping Service


The census taken every ten years determines how much federal money goes to New Mexico programs for things like schools, small businesses, health care, food assistance and housing. The U.S. Census Bureau announced Monday that all counting, including door-to-door efforts, will end September 30th – a full month sooner than expected. The time crunch threatens efforts to get an accurate count in New Mexico, especially in hard-to-count areas including rural and tribal communities. 

pefertig via Pixabay / Creative Commons

New Mexico could soon have a retirement plan for privately employed and self-employed workers after a bill to create an online retirement exchange passed nearly unanimously through the legislature and heads to the governor’s desk for her signature.

 

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State ethics commissions tasked with investigating lawmakers for bad behavior are in a tricky position when they have to ask those same lawmakers for funding year after year. New Mexico’s Ethics Commission is not yet fully staffed or fully funded for 2020 after receiving only $500,000 from legislators last session.

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A bill that would legalize recreational marijuana in New Mexico stalled in the Senate last year. Over the summer, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham convened a work group to study the issue and gather public comment, and the group released recommendations for legalization that—among other things—prioritized equity for people who have been disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs. Rep. Javier Martínez, one of the sponsors of this year’s bill, spoke with KUNM about this year’s proposal, which passed out of the Senate Public Affairs Committee on a 4-3 party-line vote Tuesday, Jan. 28. 

puroticorico via Flickr / Creative Commons

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham delivers the annual State of the State address today at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe, launching the 2020 legislative session. KUNM fact-checks and provides context for her remarks live with our Your N.M. Government media partners New Mexico PBS and The Santa Fe Reporter, as well as the New Mexico Political Report, Searchlight New Mexico and The Alamogordo Daily News

LISTEN: Will New Mexico Try To Clean Up Politics?

Jan 13, 2016

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 01/14 8a: 

The state Legislature is getting ready to meet this month in Santa Fe and lawmakers will be focused on putting together a budget. But many people are hoping lawmakers will also address recent high-profile corruption cases and pass tougher measures to keep government clean. 

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol via flickr

In March the New Mexico state Legislature unanimously passed a bill that would basically eliminate what critics call “policing for profit,” the ability of law enforcement agencies to seize cars, cash and other property police say were used in committing a crime. The practice originated in the 1980s as a tool to fight back against big drug dealers, but civil liberties groups on the right and left of the political spectrum say the lure of big money has now corrupted government agencies, who use the law to pad their coffers.

Guests:

Legislative Session Update

Mar 18, 2015

Sun. 3/22 7p: Generation Justice is joined by Veronica Garcia, Executive Director of New Mexico Voices for Children and Patrick Davis, Executive Director of ProgressNow NM to discuss the impacts of this year’s legislative session moving forward. On top of the legislative coverage, we will have a stellar line-up of calendar events and music to share with everyone.