North Dakota

Leslie Peterson via Flickr

In 2016, thousands of people from many tribal nations converged to support the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota in trying to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline was built anyway, and it has sprung leaks since it was constructed. But this week, a federal judge ordered the Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL, to stop transporting oil pending a full environmental review. 

 

Liz Mckenzie is a New Mexico musician who traveled to Standing Rock in 2016 with supplies and lived there for months as water protectors faced state violence. She spoke with KUNM, first offering a land acknowledgement.

Courtesy Mayahuel Garza

A judge ruled Monday, Feb. 13, against temporarily halting the oil pipeline in North Dakota, though court battles are ongoing, and people there continue to protest. Mayahuel Garza from Los Lunas, N.M., has made many trips to North Dakota to stand with the water protectors, deliver supplies and offer traditional Aztec ceremony and dance. She spoke with KUNM late last week about her reaction to the news that the Army Corps of Engineers was clearing the way for construction of the pipeline to begin. 

Joe Catron via Flickr / Creative Commons License

UNM’s Kiva Club, a Native American issues student club, and a Native American Studies class are holding a demonstration Thursday to show solidarity with tribes from across the country that are protesting the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota.