President Trump

Margaret Wright

On Saturday, Nov. 7, just after the presidential race was called for Biden, hundreds turned up on the steps of the state’s capital for a rally against election results--though there has not yet been evidence of fraud. And a quick content warning: This story contains antagonism based in transphobia.  

Lonnie Anderson

Attack ads and contemporary political rhetoric about crime have a disturbing campaign ancestor: The Willie Horton ad that may have cost Michael Dukakis the presidential election in 1988. It relied on racism for its efficacy, and it ushered in an era of so-called "tough-on-crime" laws and posturing that nearly broke criminal legal systems, like the one in Albuquerque. Executive Producer and longtime criminal justice reporter Marisa Demarco navigates in Episode 13 how racist, fear-based electioneering warped the country's approach to crime. That continues to this day, favoring quick vengeance over long-term solutions that might have a real impact on crime rates. It's an addictive cycle: These methods, in fact, might be a big part of creating the problem candidates are promising to solve with them when they're counting on fear to salvage their flagging campaigns. 

WyoFile via Flickr / Creative Commons

The news that President Trump contracted coronavirus raised a lot of questions about what could happen this election cycle, which is already under the unusual pressure of a pandemic. KUNM spoke with Lonna Atkeson from the University of New Mexico’s Center for the Study of Voting, Elections and Democracy this afternoon to find out some of the answers. She described what her morning had been like since speculation and word of Trump’s possible illness started sweeping the globe.

President Donald Trump says an executive order he signed on Saturday funds a $400 weekly supplement to unemployment benefits. But it likely won't be as helpful as it seems.


Marisa Demarco / KUNM

In the last weeks of July, we saw high temperatures across the country. The streets heated up, and we’re not talking about the weather. We’re talking about federal forces sent to Portland, Chicago, Albuquerque and other cities. The arrival of these agents was met with public outcry and increased skepticism by lawmakers and residents alike. Others support the move. In episode 3, we take a look at what exactly is going on and what it means for our civil liberties and our democracy.

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

The U.S. House of Representatives is holding open hearings in its impeachment inquiry into President Trump. All hearings will be streamed through this video player as they are live. You can also tune in to KUNM's live broadcast or stream the audio here on our website. 

Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

The U.S. House of Representatives is voting to formalize its ongoing impeachment inquiry. The resolution before lawmakers outlines the next steps in their investigation. Watch the debate and vote on the House floor live or tune in to 89.9 KUNM at 7:00 a.m. Thursday, October 31. 

Liam James Doyle/NPR

Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire is testifying before the House intelligence committee about a whistleblower complaint reportedly connected to President Trump's communication with Ukraine's president. Lawmakers have demanded to see the complaint, which had been withheld. Special coverage begins Thursday, September 25 at 7:00 a.m. on KUNM. 

Updated at 9:03 p.m. ET

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Abortion rights advocates in New Mexico are reacting to reports that the Trump Administration will end federal funding for family planning clinics that provide abortions or refer patients to other abortion providers.

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New Mexicans are reacting to President Trump’s suggestion that some teachers should carry weapons at school. Shootings here have changed the way some people think about public safety.

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An Albuquerque police officer will be among President Donald Trump’s guests at the State of the Union tonight. Officer Ryan Holets met a pregnant woman struggling with addiction on the streets last year and wound up adopting her baby. Many women are facing the same situation—and the detox and treatment options are limited. 

DACA Supporters Rally In Albuquerque

Jan 19, 2018
Sarah Trujillo via KUNM

Folks gathered this afternoon in downtown Albuquerque to urge Congress to continue protections for people who were brought to the U.S. as children illegally.

CSPAN

The Navajo Nation has criticized controversial comments made by President Trump Monday.

At a White House ceremony honoring Navajo Code Talkers who helped the United States win World War II, Trump referred to Senator Elizabeth Warren by calling her 'Pocahontas'—a racially-charged term many find offensive. 

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All over the country, people who signed up for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program have been speaking out about President Trump’s decision to rescind that program. And a federal judge said on Thursday that he’s going to try to rule quickly on the lawsuits filed to challenge the end of DACA, which shielded many college students.

Down in Las Cruces, New Mexico State University sits just 40 miles from the border. Former Republican Gov. Garrey Carruthers is the chancellor there. He said the university has no idea how many DACA students attend NMSU, because they don’t ask people about their status when they enroll. Trump’s decision, he said, was a violation of trust.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Hundreds of young people who were brought into the U.S. as kids without citizenship status attend colleges around New Mexico. Many were shielded from deportation by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. President Trump announced the end of DACA Tuesday, Sept. 5, and will begin phasing out the program in March, which will affect 800,000 recipients nationwide.

Hundreds of people marched at the University of New Mexico campus Tuesday afternoon to demand equality and rights for immigrant students.  

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Before last year’s presidential election, University of New Mexico student Joshua Ramirez was paying careful attention to what the candidates were saying about national security and foreign policy. He’s a third-generation soldier and a Republican. He’s already served for a year in Kuwait, and anytime through October, he could be called to duty.

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President Trump Tweeted Wednesday morning that transgender people will again be barred from the U.S. military.

It’s unclear what this means for the thousands of transgender service members in the military today. The president’s press secretary said the White House and Department of Defense will have to work together to figure that out. The Pentagon had already delayed accepting transgender applicants into the military through at least January 2018.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

There are about 1,400 Iraqi nationals in the United States who could be sent back to Iraq any day now under new Trump Administration policies no matter how long they’ve lived here. 

One refugee in Albuquerque has been fearing his time is up in the country, even though he spent years helping the U.S. military during the Iraq War. Immigration authorities have ordered him to report to their offices for removal on Thursday, July 13. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

About 1,400 Iraqis could be deported from the U.S. under President Trump’s new policies. A federal judge temporarily halted their deportation through Monday, July 24, but a man who lives in Albuquerque has been ordered to report this week for removal from the U.S.—it could be dangerous for him. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement under President Donald Trump is changing how it effectively prioritizes immigrants for deportation. Immigrant rights advocates in New Mexico say these days, anyone can become a target. That unpredictability is forcing people to make some hard choices. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

May 1 is International Workers Day, a celebration of the working class and labor around the world. Here in New Mexico, civil rights organizations, religious leaders, unions and families will participate in a national strike and marches, and a rally in Albuquerque that’s expected to draw thousands.

Marchers Rally In Support Of Science

Apr 24, 2017
comfreak via Pixabay / public domain

Communities held marches across the nation over the weekend in support of science and scientific research.

Laura Paskus is the environment reporter for NMPoliticalReport. She covered march planning and the Las Cruces march and spoke with KUNM’s Elaine Baumgartel.

Trump's Border Wall Proposal Faces Lawsuit

Apr 17, 2017
pixel2013 via Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/en/america-mexico-border-elections-1999384/ / Creative Commons

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit against President Trump’s administration last week targeting a plan to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico. The group is calling for the federal government to investigate the wall’s environmental impacts. 

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET

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This week Attorney General Jeff Sessions said he would withhold federal grants to cities that don’t follow federal rules on immigration enforcement. Santa Fe Mayor Javier Gonzales has been an outspoken critic of the Trump Administration’s stance on immigration. He says he won’t be changing the city’s openly immigrant-friendly policies.

LISTEN: New Mexico Under Trump's Energy Policies

Mar 29, 2017
San Juan Citizens Alliance/EcoFlight

KUNM Call In Show 3/30 8a: President Trump signed an executive order this week rolling back environmental regulations. It ends a moratorium on coal mine leases and eases restrictions on methane flaring by the oil and gas industry, among other things. We'll explore what this means for New Mexico. Are environmental regulations hurting or helping the economy here? What is the government's role in protecting the environment? We'd like to hear from you. Email callinshow@kunm.org or call in live during the show. 

Judge Prohibits Jail From Holding Prisoners For ICE

Mar 28, 2017
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President Trump’s administration this month began publishing a weekly report of local and state law enforcement agencies that have refused to detain people so that federal agents can determine their legal status.

But a federal judge in New Mexico recently approved a settlement that prohibits the San Juan County jail from doing just that - holding inmates past their release date at the request of federal agents.

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President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program. This annotation features the text of the new executive order along with context and analysis from NPR journalists.

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President Trump eliminated protections for transgender students that allow them to use the bathroom of their choice on Wednesday. In New Mexico’s largest school district, those rights are preserved. 

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