protests

Hannah Colton / KUNM

State Republicans had planned on featuring the New Mexico Civil Guard as special guests at a rally in Clovis on Aug. 22, before the militia group pulled out, citing racist remarks by one of the invited speakers. The Civil Guard, whose members have showed up heavily armed at several protests in Albuquerque this summer, also had their Facebook page removed this week as the platform culled hundreds of pages it says are tied to violence. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

In the last weeks of July, we saw high temperatures across the country. The streets heated up, and we’re not talking about the weather. We’re talking about federal forces sent to Portland, Chicago, Albuquerque and other cities. The arrival of these agents was met with public outcry and increased skepticism by lawmakers and residents alike. Others support the move. In episode 3, we take a look at what exactly is going on and what it means for our civil liberties and our democracy.

Michael Kappel via Flickr / Creative Commons . https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Let’s Talk New Mexico 7/30, 8a: The Trump administration announced last week that it’s sending 35 federal agents to Albuquerque, saying they’ll fight violent crime as part of Operation Legend. But exactly what that means is unclear, and many people fear the agents will crack down on protestors, or target immigrants or low-income, largely Brown and Black communities that have borne the brunt of some past police operations. This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico we’ll talk with elected officials and community organizers about this deployment of federal agents, and we want to hear from you.

Leslie Granda-Hill / 2020

This week, we get into what has disappeared from our lives—good or bad—during the pandemic. Episode 2 is all about what’s going, going, gone, maybe for good. We learn of attempts to erase people from the Census. We talk to Sen. Martin Heinrich about the erosion of our civil liberties. We reflect on what’s fading from our relationships and mental wellness. We hear from a COVID-19 survivor, so the realities of the virus don’t slip away. We examine the consciousness of community and the loss of a collective future with an international futurist. We reflect on a disappearing chicken and what life was like pre-pandemic. And we try to see and hear a vanishing Rio Grande.

Duke City Repertory Theater

With thousands of people in the streets for Black Lives Matter demonstrations in recent weeks, there’s been a movement across the country for theaters shuttered by the pandemic to open their lobby areas to support protestors. One space in downtown Albuquerque has answered that call. 

Dominic Smith via Flickr CC


In episode 75, we're talking data privacy, surveillance, sophisticated bots, racially biased tech and misinformation on social media in the time of COVID, BLM and the upcoming election. We check in with researchers, privacy advocates and an artist/activist, who talk about how our data is valuable to corporations or governments that want to exploit their knowledge of us for policing, political or capitalistic reasons.

Nash Jones / KUNM


The country is grappling with practical steps for ending police brutality and racism in policing. We explore some local ideas in episode 74, from completely burning down the system to moderate reform to minor policy changes. Community and Black Lives Matter organizers, Albuquerque’s mayor and City Councilor Lan Sena, and activists who work with and against police weigh in on what the future of public safety could look like.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

We are nearly halfway through the year of 2020, it is June and reality is forever changed. While learning to adjust to life during a global pandemic, the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers has given rise to protests globally. In Episode 71, we talk about what it takes to safely navigate a pandemic and the beginnings of a revolution. It’s a heavy lift. Today we talk with a military veteran, a few activists and educators, and host Khalil Ekulona’s dad to get a deeper perspective. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM


Police violence takes many forms, and some communities in Albuquerque experience it much more than others. On Let's Talk New Mexico this week, we'll hear about how law enforcement has responded to Black Lives Matter protests over the last week in Albuquerque. How do you see police operating in your community? What needs to happen to end racist police violence in New Mexico? Join the conversation by emailing letstalk@kunm.org, or call in live at 277-5866.

Shahen books via Flickr / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

University Showcase 11/22 Friday 8a: Professor Harry Van Buren was looking for a new adventure when he took a two-year leave from the Anderson School of Management to teach at American University of Beirut. He got more than he bargained for when massive protests broke out six weeks into his arrival.

Sarah Gustavus/KUNM

Thousands of students, teachers and community members came out on Saturday in Albuquerque for the March for Our Lives rally. Survivors led a rally in Washington D.C. and Albuquerque’s event was was one of many held across the country in response to last month’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

Let's Talk 2017

Dec 20, 2017
Eglin Air Force Base via CC

Let's Talk New Mexico 12/21 8a: It was a year for hard questions about race, politics and identity. Some folks will tell you it’s because the media and social media are highlighting our divisions. Others will say it’s because national politics are pinned on dog-whistle rhetoric tinged with racism and xenophobia.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Elaine Baumgartel / KUNM

Donald Trump will be sworn in as president Friday, and some New Mexicans are mobilizing in response. Protests and celebrations are planned at university campuses, local landmarks, and downtown areas. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Protests have been erupting in cities around the United States in the days since Donald Trump was elected president. Hundreds of students at the University of New Mexico staged a walkout Wednesday evening.  

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Demonstrators protested police violence in downtown Albuquerque on Wednesday, Oct. 12, a day after a hung jury resulted in a mistrial in the murder trial of two former APD officers who shot and killed James Boyd.  

Unpacking Trump's Visit To N.M.

May 25, 2016
Elaine Baumgartel / KUNM

KUNM Call In Show 5/26 8a: 

Protests outside Donald Trump's Albuquerque rally became a national story after people stormed police barriers and threw rocks at officers. But before all of that went down, hundreds demonstrated peacefully for hours. 

Mayor Richard Berry and APD Chief Gordon Eden addressed the media this afternoon regarding yesterday's protest, which the mayor earlier characterized as "mayhem." At today's news conference, Berry reiterated that what happened was not productive and said demonstrators were attempting to escalate the situation. 

Gordon described it this way: "What was a peaceful protest turned into this mob state. They were stopping traffic and engaging people who were doing nothing more than trying to get from point A to point B." 

Momentum Builds at Sunday APD Demonstration

Mar 31, 2014
A still from the Daily Lobo's news show "The Howl"

  

Late Sunday night, protesters convened again in front of police headquarters, and tear gas was dispersed for the second time. The group disbanded but vowed to return. Stay tuned to KUNM 89.9 and kunm.org for updates.

The day started with city government websites going dark. The hacker collective Anonymous had called for a protest of the Albuquerque Police Department.

APD Clashes With Protesters

Mar 31, 2014
Screen Shot from the Daily Lobo's news show "The Howl"

 ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry said last night a 10-hour protest over recent police shootings has turned from peaceful into "mayhem," as officers in riot gear clashed with protesters.

The demonstrators blocked traffic, tried to get on freeways and shouted anti-police slogans. The Albuquerque Journal reports Berry said one officer was injured, rocks were thrown and at one point protesters trapped police in a vehicle and tried to break the windows.