KUNM

Public Comment

inlandwest via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Environmental advocates are worried that the coronavirus is preventing the public from engaging with planning processes, comment periods and policy developments held by federal agencies – which means an important decision about fracking in New Mexico could fly under the radar.

SupportPDX Via Flickr

Farming and ranching generate nearly half of the agricultural and food processing industry’s revenue in New Mexico - about 4 billion dollars a year. A program that aims to help farmers and ranchers boost crop numbers and protect habitats for wildlife is getting an update. Now, the public can weigh in. 

Bud Ellison / Via Flickr

Wilderness boundaries and some protections for at-risk animals and rivers are determined by National Forest management plans. Three forests in New Mexico have plans that are due for an update and the Forest Service is taking public comment on proposed changes.

David Syzdek Via Creative Commons

New Mexico Game and Fish is proposing changes to trapping rules of furred animals in the state.

Some of those proposed changes include mandatory education courses, restrictions to where traps can be placed and a limit to how many animals can be caught. 

The public can now weigh in on whether to ban controversial ‘cyanide bombs’ that federal officials use for wildlife control.

Pexels via CC

The state Supreme Court created a commission to look at how adult guardianship works in New Mexico, and to figure out how to improve the system. After a series of public meetings, the group released 17 recommendations, mostly aimed at accountability. 

Exploring Accessibility In The Bosque

Jan 21, 2016
Rita Daniels

The city of Albuquerque plans to break ground next month on phase two of a controversial multi-use trail in the Rio Grande bosque. The new trail system is intended to keep people from trampling sensitive areas and to increase wheelchair accessibility.  

Muscling Down On Mussels

Dec 22, 2015
Gene Wilburn / Creative Commons via Flickr

 

New Mexico Game and Fish officials are trying to stop two species of non-native mussels from spreading into local waters by revising the Aquatic Species Rules. The department has opened public comment for the proposed rule changes.