Public Health New Mexico

KUNM's Public Health New Mexico reporting project provides in-depth, investigative and continuous coverage of public health in New Mexico, with an emphasis on poverty. For all articles and web exclusive content, go to publichealthnm.org 

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Earlier this week, President Donald Trump asked Congress to claw back $7 billion in federal funding for children’s health insurance coverage. But Washington, D.C.,’s decisions probably won’t have an immediate impact here.

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Let’s Talk New Mexico 5/10 8a: About one in four New Mexicans has an EBT card in their wallet that they use to buy food. We’re continuing the conversation this week about food assistance and new work requirements that Congress is considering in the 2018 Farm Bill.

UNM Cancer Researcher Awarded Grants To Study HPV

May 5, 2018

HPV, or human papilloma virus, is the most commonly contracted sexually transmitted infection but little is known about the way it works. As Public Health New Mexico’s Sarah Trujillo reports, local researchers won two grants to study the virus and design new ways to measure and treat infections. 

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A high schooler from Carlsbad organized the Stand for the Second movement Wednesday for students who support the Second Amendment.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

When pregnant women experience discrimination and stress, their babies do, too. This could help explain disturbing racial inequities in maternal and infant health here.

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Let's Talk New Mexico 4/26 8a: Call 277-5866. We're talking about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and whether people in our state can access it. We'll also talk about the Farm Bill proposed in Congress, which would increase work requirements for people using SNAP, along with other changes. Have you applied for SNAP? How did the process go for you? Or what do you think of work requirements for people participating in this programs? How can people in New Mexico get the food they need? Email letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet #letstalkNM or call in live during the show. 

Donovan Shortey, navajophotography.com via Flickr

 

Getting health care when you’re a veteran living on the Navajo reservation can be an all-day affair, starting with hours of driving to Albuquerque. Last week, the Navajo Nation Council unanimously approved more than $2 million to fund a veterans service center on tribal land.   

New Texting Option For Warmline Support

Apr 13, 2018
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The state’s Peer-to-Peer Warmline has introduced a texting option. This could help more locals early on so they won’t need to call a crisis hotline later.

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University of New Mexico undergraduate tuition has gone up over 50 percent in the last decade. The UNM Board of Regents gave the green light to raise tuition again in March. New research suggests increasing tuition could reduce student diversity. Greg Wolniak co-authored the research and spoke with Public Health New Mexico’s Sarah Trujillo.  

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

For decades, families in New Mexico have been missing out on food and medical assistance that they’re eligible for under federal law. Records show that things have gotten better in recent months. Still, the issue’s been in court for 30 years, and a federal judge says one problem is a lack of accountability within the state’s Income Support Division

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The head of the state department that oversees behavioral health services is at odds with Governor Susana Martinez’s administration over how to handle gun violence in local schools.

Ed Williams

 


New Mexico’s rate of opioid overdose deaths used to be one of the worst in the country, but it’s slowly been improving. A new study says some of the state’s strategies could be helping.

Katharine Egli for the Solutions Journalism Network

What if big telecom isn’t the only game in town for internet service? Member-owned cooperatives and community networks are springing up around the country. And what’s more, they’re making net neutrality—unthrottled access to an open net—a core value.

Katharine Egli for the Solutions Journalism Network

Quality internet service is key to overcoming poverty, according to studies worldwide. But all over the U.S., people of color and folks with low incomes are less likely to have access to an affordable, reliable connection. Plus, big corporations are often unwilling to lay line through tough terrain without a lot of customers.

Sarah Gustavus

Let's Talk New Mexico 4/5 8a:  Internet access is expensive and often slow in rural communities across New Mexico. How might improving internet speed and access help all New Mexicans  pursue educational and economic opportunities? 

Alexa Graham via Flickr / Creative Commons License

 


There could be more peace of mind for people in Albuquerque who don’t qualify for the state’s medical cannabis program if Mayor Tim Keller signs a measure city councilors passed on Monday. It would decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis.

 

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The Human Rights Campaign released the results of their health equity study and a couple of New Mexico's hospitals did really well.

516 Arts

 


Americans are deeply divided over how to handle immigration and an art exhibit in Albuquerque is working to bring new perspectives into the conversation.

TIMELINE: School Threats In N.M. Since Parkland

Mar 16, 2018

African American Low Birth Weight Rates Stagnate

Mar 16, 2018
Christian Haugen via Flickr / Creative Commons

 

Babies who are born underweight are at higher risk of developing health problems or even dying.

New state data show the rate of babies born with low birth weights to African American moms here hasn’t improved in almost two decades.

Not All N.M. Schools Supported Student Walkouts

Mar 14, 2018
May Ortega / KUNM News

 

Some local schools encouraged their students to protest on Wednesday. But Rio Rancho High School was not one them.

Taos County Gets Its First Bariatric Ambulance

Mar 12, 2018
Joaquin Gonzales, Director / Taos County EMS

 

Taos County recently rolled out the area’s first ambulance made specifically to transport obese patients. It can make it safer and more comfortable for heavier people to get medical assistance.

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Some local advocacy groups are teaming up to provide more resources for children who’ve been sex-trafficked. Right now, there’s not a lot out there to help them recover.

Sarah Gustavus

A proposal to decriminalize recreational cannabis in Albuquerque would do away with jail time and shrink fines. Co-sponsor Albuquerque City Councilor Pat Davis said the time is right and the measure has a lot of support. He also said it would also help police focus on more pressing things.

After Escape, A Long Road To Recovery

Mar 1, 2018
GLady via Pixabay / Creative Commons License

Over the years, New Mexico’s resources for human trafficking victims have begun to reach more and more people. But the state still has a long way to go to help survivors.

Courtesy UNM

 


 

One Albuquerque clinic has been testing almost all of its pregnant patients for hepatitis C, according to UNM researchers. That means more people could be cured down the line.

UNM Police: If There's A Shooter, We Go In

Feb 23, 2018
Arianna Sena / Creative Commons

Last week University of New Mexico campus police responded to reports of a man threatening folks with a gun. The school sent a mass text alert and officers eventually arrested a man with a BB gun. Public Health New Mexico’s Sarah Trujillo spoke with UNMPD’s Lieutenant Trace Peck about what would happen if someone was firing a gun on campus.

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Funding for public early childhood programs is tight around New Mexico, and it’s disproportionately students of color who miss out. Allen Sanchez of the New Mexico Conference of Catholic Bishops sparked debate last week when he told an Associated Press reporter that systemic racism is a factor in why legislation that could have fixed the problem didn’t get a fair shake. 

State Budget Boosts Public Health

Feb 15, 2018
New Mexico In Depth

 


Lawmakers passed a $6.3 billion budget Wednesday night. One billion of that will go to behavioral health care and the Department of Health.

 

Health workers would get a raise, and anti-smoking programs would see a multimillion-dollar boost.

Pet Food Fee Measure Advances In Santa Fe

Feb 12, 2018
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Half of the animals that enter shelters in New Mexico end up being euthanized, and lawmakers are getting closer to agreeing on a measure that would charge a fee to pet food companies to help fund spay and neuter services across the state.

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