KUNM

Public Health New Mexico

Mission

KUNM‘s Public Health New Mexico reporting project provides in-depth, investigative and continuous coverage of public health in New Mexico, with an emphasis on poverty.

We cover the politicians, the policies, and the agencies responsible for sustaining public health and solving poverty. To fully report on these topics, we give voice to those who are voiceless in the media: people and practitioners; advocates and analysts; researchers and activists; and people hoping to build a better way of life. Through our work, citizens are engaged, government is made more accountable, and the profile of public health and poverty is elevated by expanded public discourse and civic engagement.

This project has been sustained by support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundationthe McCune Charitable FoundationCon Alma Health Foundation. and private donors.

KUNM broadcasts on transmitter throughout central and northern New Mexico, reaching more than half the state’s population.  Nielsen Audio Research from Fall 2014 shows 100,000 people a week listen to KUNM.

makelessnoise via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Some kids have a hard time getting enough to eat while school is out for winter break. Albuquerque Public Schools will offer free meals for students starting Friday.

Courtesy UNM Midwives

 

Research has shown that newborns have healthier birth weights when their mothers receive proper prenatal care and that stress can contribute to early deliveries.

The University of New Mexico Hospital's CenteringPregnancy program for expecting mothers focuses on the social aspects of maternal health.

 

Kelly Gallagher, the head of the hospital’s Midwifery Division, is in charge of the program.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s bankruptcy process is underway, and a window is closing for survivors of priest sexual abuse to ask to be on a committee that will represent all survivors in negotiating a settlement with the church. A federal official is expected to select the committee members sometime early the week of Dec. 17.

Creative Commons / Pixabay


The number of babies born dependent on drugs in New Mexico more than tripled between 2008 and 2017 according to new data from the state Department of Health.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province on Friday released the names of 42 Jesuits they say have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of a minor. One of the men identified has ties to a parish in Albuquerque’s Old Town.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Albuquerque Public Schools is giving substitute teachers pay raises in an effort to recruit hundreds more of them.

APS posted a notice Tuesday that substitute teachers will get pay increases of 24-30 percent come January 1. The new salary schedule is as follows. 

The district currently has about 1000 substitute teachers, and wants to hire 500 more. They also want a couple hundred more substitute educational assistants, who will get a 15 percent raise.

Creative Commons

Open enrollment on the New Mexico health insurance exchange ends Dec. 15, and changes to the Affordable Care Act at the federal level have brought mixed results to New Mexico consumers for 2019.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

UPDATE 12/4: A teacher accused of targeting Native American students in an incident on Halloween resigned from her job with Albuquerque Public Schools, effective Friday, November 30.

Former Cibola High School teacher Mary Eastin confirmed on Tuesday that she chose to end her employment at the district.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

The National Institutes of Health is in Albuquerque this week for its All of Us Research Program to better tailor medical treatment to individual people.

Courtesy of ABQ DSA

Albuquerque police increased traffic stops by 34 percent this year compared to last year, according to data from the city. One local political group is concerned about that kind of contact with law enforcement, especially for people of color. That’s why they're offering free brake-light repairs this weekend in the International District, a low-income and racially diverse area of Albuquerque known for drawing a lot of police activity.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The Rio Rancho school board voted 4-1 Monday evening to put guns in the hands of school security guards. The measure is aimed at keeping students safe in the wake of school shootings here and across the nation.

Courtesy Heading Home NM

 

The city of Albuquerque has opened one of its emergency shelters early.

Temperatures will go down to the teens in Albuquerque tonight, according to the National Weather Service, and remain in the 20s overnight for the rest of the week.

Rodolfo Clix / Pexels.com

Let's Talk New Mexico 11/15 8a: Call now (505) 277-5866. Survivors of clergy sexual abuse continue to come forward in New Mexico, and many people are calling for the Catholic Church to come clean about what they knew and when. On the show, we'll explore what accountability could look like for crimes that happened years or decades ago. What are the effects of Church secrecy around clergy abuse? And how can communities heal from these kinds of trauma? 

We’d like to hear from you. Email LetsTalk@KUNM.org or call in live during the show at (505) 277-5866, Thursday morning at 8 here on 89.9 KUNM.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

In response to deadly school shootings across the nation, the Rio Rancho Public School Board is considering arming school security guards. A vote is expected Monday evening on a proposal to allow guards to carry firearms – with plans to eventually hire enough to station at all 20 schools in the district.

May Ortega | KUNM

Libertarians in New Mexico didn’t do so well this election. None of the five candidates running for office here won their races.

But Senate candidate Gary Johnson is still optimistic.

Pages