race

Robbie Sugg

 


Summer is winding down and harvest season is quickly approaching. The change of the season is always very beautiful, but before the excitement of the leaves changing colors begins, we have to understand the dangers that many people are facing. With food security concerns around the state and a potential eviction crisis on the horizon it is important to ensure that everyone has the basics for survival. In Episode 7, we look at the essentials of survival—shelter, health care and food—and attempt to see not only what the problems are, but how they can be fixed.

 

Photo by Nani Chacon

In the old days—like last year—mid-August was a time when students prepared to get back to class. A time to reconnect with friends and compare summer vacation stories and to show off the fashion of your new school outfits, if you were so lucky. In 2020, instead of students worrying about who has a crush on who, they’re thinking about who has COVID and who doesn't. Parents are concerned with how their kids will get a quality education. Teachers are not only focused on the adjustment to teaching remotely but on the health risks of being called back to campus. In Episode 6, we hear from a panel of teachers, students in three different levels of school, a union rep for college instructors, Khalil’s mom Olufemi Ekulona, as well as renowned anti-racism educator Jane Elliott. Break out your notebooks. There’s a lot to learn, and what is covered today will be on the exam.

Nash Jones / KUNM

Most of the demonstrations calling for justice and an end to racist police violence in New Mexico over the last two weeks have been in Albuquerque. On Saturday morning, the more conservative, western suburb of Rio Rancho held its own demonstration with about 100 people gathering on the steps of City Hall. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Albuquerque residents have joined people around the world in protest following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. In the media, peaceful demonstrations have been conflated with property damage done by smaller groups of people, playing into narratives that give rise to aggressive responses like what the Trump administration is pushing. In episode 70, we talk about how law enforcement responses to recent protests seem to differ for different groups. We speak with an organizer, a youth detained after a protest, Albuquerque Police Department leadership, and a longtime criminal justice reporter.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 5/28, 8a: Many of the people protesting COVID-related restrictions around New Mexico are white, while the virus has disproportionately impacted Native communities. This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we look at how whiteness plays into anti-shutdown responses in towns that border tribal communities.

Trevier Gonzalez

The past few weeks have seen a rise to anti-shutdown protests in many parts of the country. Some have observed the number of weapons at some of these protests, others have observed that most of the participants are white. That made us think, how does race factor into the conversations around re-opening? In episode 66, we talk with some of the louder voices in the state speaking out against New Mexico’s shutdown, and national anti-racism activist Tim Wise. And we hear from a guy who’s worked for years to grapple with his own privilege. These conversations might give us a window into what the future holds.

Reese Brown via CC

In episode 44, we talk about CDC data and state data showing that the virus is harming, disproportionately, brown and black people around the U.S.—and here at home. We hear from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez about the bureaucratic hurdles to accessing billions of dollars allotted to tribes in the relief package, and why that money hasn't reached the ground yet, despite the dire public health emergency unfolding for tribes.

The NIH Wants Your Health Info For Research

Nov 28, 2018
May Ortega | KUNM

 

The National Institutes of Health is in Albuquerque this week for its All of Us Research Program to better tailor medical treatment to individual people.

acme401 / Flickr / CREATIVE COMMONS

Fri. 7/6 8a: Peace Talks Radio: When we talk about music that promotes and celebrates peace, hip hop often gets left out of the conversation. Critics speculate about the genre's negative influences, from hypersexual music videos to lyrics that glamorize guns and drugs. A recent Washington Post headline quoted jazz musician Wynton Marsalis calling popular hip hop "more damaging than a statue of Robert E. Lee." But what about the positive impacts the music has had on countless fans? 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Congress boosted the budget for the battle against the opioid epidemic this year, and a chunk of it—$100 million—is slated for treatment and prevention in rural communities. But something about how lawmakers chose to prioritize that money caught a New Mexico health official by surprise: the funding is focused on counties that are mostly white.

Photo by Erica Yoon Courtesy of the Journalism & Women Symposium

 Nikole Hannah-Jones is an award-winning investigative reporter who covers civil rights and racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine. Last year she won a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship - often called the genius grant. This speech was delivered on Oct.

Racism In The News

Feb 14, 2018
Jon S via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 2/15 8a. Call 277-5866 - Diversity has increasingly become a buzz word for businesses and industries in recent years and that includes the journalism industry, as newsrooms struggle to better represent the communities they serve. Here in New Mexico, the recent publication of a racist cartoon by the state's largest newspaper sparked a firestorm of criticism. We'll discuss racism in the news and diversity in newsrooms. 

Let's Talk Race And Immigration In New Mexico

Feb 1, 2018
Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 2/1 8a. Call 277-5866. Division over immigration policy shut down the federal government for three days. And in his State of the Union address this week, President Trump compared immigrants to criminal gangs and terrorists and again called for an overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws. We’ll look closely at issues of race and Latino and Hispanic identity in New Mexico and how they inform policy and political rhetoric on immigration at the local and national levels.

Let's Talk 2017

Dec 20, 2017
Eglin Air Force Base via CC

Let's Talk New Mexico 12/21 8a: It was a year for hard questions about race, politics and identity. Some folks will tell you it’s because the media and social media are highlighting our divisions. Others will say it’s because national politics are pinned on dog-whistle rhetoric tinged with racism and xenophobia.

Women Leaders Of Color To Stand Against Racism

Apr 26, 2017
YWCA New Mexico / with permission

  The YWCA is hosting its 1oth Annual Stand Against Racism community discussion in Albuquerque tonight. This year features a panel of women leaders of color who do work around race and racism.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Extremist opinion writer Milo Yiannopoulos delivered a speech at New Mexico’s flagship university in Albuquerque on Friday just hours after President Trump issued an executive order on immigration and refugees. Yiannopoulos champions free speech, but several dissenters were escorted from his event by police.   

Melissa Tso member of the Red Nation and the Party for Socialism and Liberation

Police violence against people of color has been at the forefront of national debate in recent months. And in New Mexico, a group advocating for indigenous concerns called the Red Nation has been active on this issue since the killing of James Boyd two years ago.

LISTEN: Let's Talk Race, Police And Recent Shootings

Jul 13, 2016
hugovk via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show 7/14 8a: This week, we want to hear your response to recent police shootings of African Americans—and the killing of five Dallas police officers. How do you think the shootings of officers in Dallas have affected the national conversation on race and policing? What are the ripple effects of these deaths right here at home in New Mexico? How has the widespread anger and fear affected police officers and their ability to do their jobs? How are activists taking care of themselves in the face of a problem that's hard to gain ground with? 

Race And Police Militarization Part II

Aug 27, 2014
hugovk via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 8/28 8a: 

Images from protests in Ferguson, Missouri have outlined the reality of racial inequality and police militarization throughout the United States. We'll continue last week's conversation and ask law enforcement officials, does this create an "us v. them" mindset for police? What about in communities?

We'd like to hear from you - email callinshow@kunm.org, post your comments online or call in live during the show. 

Guests: 

Race Relations And Police Use Of Force

Aug 18, 2014
hugovk via Flickr / Creative Commons License

KUNM Call In Show Thu. 8/21 8a.m.

Images from the ongoing protests in Ferguson, MO have starkly outlined the reality of racial inequality and police militarization throughout the United States. Has this led to an "us v. them" mindset both within a police force and for community members?  And how much do the levels of fear and distrust increase when the make-up of a department doesn't reflect a community's ethnic and/or racial composition?