Red Nation

Eric J. Garcia / El Machete Illustrated

The final presidential debate of 2020 got passing marks because the candidates managed to take turns. But rarely did they roll out the kind of action plans the moderator was looking for. She kept asking: If elected, what will you do about this big problem we are facing? Still, candidates did not venture into specifics. We think that was by design. The strategy was, make debate No. 1 so bad that by the time debate No. 2 comes around, expectations are so low, everyone will just be grateful it’s not incoherent shouting and call it good. But in a time with multiple crises pressing down on us, specific plans can pull people together, provide direction and alleviate anxiety. So that’s what this episode is all about. What do you want to hear candidates talking about? What kinds of plans and policies do you wish they were outlining before the public?

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The University of New Mexico Board of Regents is expected to vote on Wednesday, Oct. 20 on a new official seal design. The move follows many years of campaigning by students and faculty with the UNM Kiva Club and the Red Nation, who say the old seal, depicting a frontiersman and a conquistador, celebrates genocide and conquest. But the old seal is far more the only symbol at UNM that reflects racism against Indigenous people, says Alysia Coriz, a Native American Studies major and co-president of the Kiva Club. She spoke with KUNM earlier this year about how she would like to see the university address other instances of racist imagery on campus, including places named after violent colonizers. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The New Mexico Civil Guard has gotten a lot of media attention this week. After escalating tensions at a June 15 protest in Old Town where a protestor was shot, the heavily armed, mostly White militia group was the subject of a lengthy Albuquerque Journal profile on July 4, as well as an NPR story that aired July 6. KUNM News chose not to air the NPR piece because we feel it left out crucial information, mischaracterized events that KUNM has covered, and provided a platform for thinly veiled racism. Instead, KUNM News Director Hannah Colton spoke with Melanie Yazzie, an assistant professor of Native American Studies and American Studies at the University of New Mexico, about media coverage of militias and how these groups evoke a history of vigilante violence against Native Americans in the region.

Action: Educate & Organize

Jan 27, 2017
Generation Justice

Join us, Sunday 1.29.17, as we listen to Dr. Bilal Sekou, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Hartford, to discuss using our inter-sectionality under the new administration. We also speak with Jennifer Marley, an organizer with the Red Nation, to discuss the continued threat to the #NODAPL movement, indigenous communities across the country and how folks can get involved. Tune in at 7:00 pm on KUNM 89.9 FM or online at KUNM.org

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

President Donald Trump signed an executive action on Tuesday approving the Dakota Access Pipeline, which water protectors have been working to stop for months. In Albuquerque on Wednesday, people gathered outside the tall Wells Fargo bank Downtown to try and stanch the flow of money to the project known as DAPL. 

Melissa Tso member of the Red Nation and the Party for Socialism and Liberation

Police violence against people of color has been at the forefront of national debate in recent months. And in New Mexico, a group advocating for indigenous concerns called the Red Nation has been active on this issue since the killing of James Boyd two years ago.