smoking

Lindsay Fox via Flickr / Creative Commons

New Mexico lawmakers amended the proposed Tobacco Products Act on Wednesday, Feb. 12, to make the new regulations friendlier to retailers, including reducing licensing fees and eliminating criminal penalties.

TBEC Review via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons

New Mexico high schoolers are more than twice as likely to vape nicotine than use traditional tobacco products, according to the state’s Department of Health. A bill moving through the state Legislature that would license tobacco in the state for the first time would also regulate e-cigarettes. 

Vaping Illness Cases Rise To 12 In New Mexico

Sep 11, 2019
Lindsay Fox via Flickr / Creative Commons License

There are more cases of vaping-related illnesses appearing all over the country, and New Mexico is no exception. 

Vaping Replacing Cigarettes Among N.M. Teens

Mar 27, 2019
May Ortega | KUNM

 

New Mexico high school students are smoking cigarettes a lot less than they used to. The rate among high schoolers in the state is at an all-time low. But now they’re using e-cigarettes. That rate is on track to outpace all other forms of tobacco use.

Senate OKs Medicaid Coverage Of Tobacco Cessation

Mar 13, 2019
Julia via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License


The state Senate unanimously passed a bill this week to have Medicaid cover services to help people quit smoking.

 

Under the proposal, Medicaid would pay for counseling, medications and other resources that help get folks off cigarettes, e-cigs and chewing tobacco.

NM’s Teen Smoking Rate Drops To All-Time Low

Jun 29, 2018
Julia via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

New data released by the New Mexico Department of Health show the state’s rate of high schoolers smoking cigarettes is at an all-time low. And they’re using other tobacco products less often, too.

Debora Cartagena, CDC

According to the American Lung Association, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada and Texas all received Fs for their tobacco prevention efforts. That’s primarily because the states aren’t spending amounts recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.

Texas got the worst grades in the Southwest, including an F for smoke-free air and restrictions.

Debora Cartagena, CDC

Native Americans have the highest rates of smoking before, during and after pregnancy than any other ethnic group in the nation. That’s according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control.

According to the CDC, 55 percent of Native American women smoked before pregnancy. During pregnancy, that rate dropped significantly to 26 percent. However, that rate was still the highest of any racial or ethnic group in the nation.