South Valley

Vanessa Bowen

In episode 51, we talk about food access, cooking and gardening during the pandemic. Being able to get healthy food is a problem for many people all the time in New Mexico, but it's become even more of a struggle these last weeks. Many people are working to make sure folks here have food despite new obstacles, like people buying up some items at grocery stores and disrupting the supply chain, social distancing, and extra sanitation precautions to avoid the spread of coronavirus. 

Bryce Dix / KUNM

On a chilly night deep in the South Valley right along the Albuquerque city limits, a group of people dressed in heavy coats gathered on a street corner. These residents of the Vecinos del Bosque neighborhood gathered to protest a new co-housing development project that would put 27 new houses between their historic neighborhood and the Rio Grande. They waved flashlights on their signs for cars passing by. One read ‘plant trees not condominiums.’

Courtesy South Valley Studio Tour

Women's Focus, 11/9, Sat 12pm: The third annual South Valley Studio Tour takes place November 10 in Albuquerque's South Valley. It's an opportunity to see  20 artists in their studios and experience the beautiful and often little-known parts of this culturally rich part of Albuquerque.

KUNM

The Albuquerque Public School board members control a massive budget and policies affecting more than 80,000 students. Three seats are up for election this fall, and KUNM invited candidates on to a live radio show on Oct. 24 to ask what they hope to do about longstanding disparities related to race, language access, class and disability. 

Let’s Talk Day of the Dead in New Mexico

Oct 17, 2019
Megan Kamerick


  Let's Talk NM 10/17, 8a:The Day of the Dead has become increasingly high profile in New Mexico over the past few years, with celebrations like Albuquerque’s Muertos y Marigolds Parade attracting thousands of attendees, and traditional practices like the creation of sacred altars to departed loved ones running headlong into not-so-traditional practices like Halloween costumes. But what is the true meaning of Día de los Muertos? And how can people for whom it is not a traditional holiday engage with it in a way that’s respectful of its continued spiritual and religious significance? 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The South Valley near Albuquerque has a long history of agricultural practice. Friday, October 4, marked the grand opening of a state-of-the-art greenhouse that will help local farmers and serve as a site where young people can learn the tradition. The shared greenhouse is the first of its kind, and it sits on land that was once an illegal dumpsite.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

It’s decision time for people hoping to get elected to leadership at the state’s largest public school district. Next Tuesday is the deadline to file for candidacy in the Albuquerque Public Schools’ board election.

So many people in America suffer long-term and dangerous illnesses that come from poor nutrition. A doctor and chef in the South Valley near Albuquerque are part of a team working on tasty solutions.

On a windy weekday, KUNM went to a modest farm in Albuquerque’s South Valley. From there we continue our Voices Behind the Vote series with a voter who’s concerned about his livestock, government spending, and his children’s futures.

Ubud Writers & Readers Festival / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

When you go to your doctor’s office to get help for something like high blood pressure, you wouldn’t expect to get a prescription to join a walking group. There’s a program that does just that for areas in Albuquerque that have higher rates of chronic diseases.

Farmer Plants His Life In Harvest Cycle

Jul 24, 2018
Melorie Begay

Life for a farmer revolves around the changing of the season, but one Albuquerque farmer’s developed an even deeper relationship with the cycle. 

Courtesy of Chris Moore

A South Valley business owner got an early wake up call from the Bernalillo County Sheriff’s office this weekend. A car ran into three storefronts, and he says the repairs will cost thousands. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

People around the state are used to seeing the flows in local rivers fluctuate. But this year, sandbars have started to widen and connect, and riverbanks are growing by yards. In some places down South, it’s completely dry for miles. KUNM caught up with journalist Laura Paskus of the New Mexico Political Report in a dry patch of the Rio Grande on Thursday morning. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

It’s summer, and that means many teenagers are headed to jobs, internships, volunteering – places where they meet adults besides their parents and teachers. The interactions can turn into mentorships that enrich the lives of the teens and the adults. This kind of synergy is thriving at a special plot of land in Albuquerque’s South Valley.

Community Farm Puts Down Roots In South Valley

Jul 11, 2017
Pixabay via Public Domain

The South Valley near Albuquerque is seeing an agricultural renaissance of sorts. First Choice Community Healthcare just broke ground today on a community farm there. Advocates are fixing their attention on local food as a form of preventative health care.

Pixabay via Creative Commons

Lawmakers and educators in New Mexico have been talking about the achievement gap in public schools for years—and trying to figure out how to close it. Testimony in a landmark education trial underway in Santa Fe touched on early childhood education programs this week. The lawsuit says they’re crucial to making sure students of color, children from families with low incomes and English language-learners succeed. But those programs aren’t widely available. 

Rashad Mahmood/KUNM

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced it’s opening a civil rights investigation into Albuquerque and Bernalillo County air pollution policies.

Neighborhood Holds Breath For Better Air Quality

May 23, 2016
Ed Williams

Air pollution is a serious problem for some neighborhoods in Albuquerque—especially in low-income areas that border an industrial zone south of downtown.

littlevisuals.co via Pexels / Creative Commons

A large fire broke out at a metal recycling plant in Albuquerque early Saturday morning. Bernalillo County issued a warning to neighbors during the fire, saying to stay inside and not breathe the potentially toxic smoke.

Wikimedia Commons via CC

Independent journalist Amy Goodman is in New Mexico this week to share stories from her new book Democracy Now: Twenty Years covering the Movements Changing America. We caught up with Goodman to talk about the connections she sees between social movements and the current election season. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Dollar stores are everywhere these days—they’re being built at a record pace, according to industry reports. In some rural communities in this state, you might not see any store except a dollar store. A campaign is calling on these discount chains to make sure products are nontoxic.

DOH To Close Public Health Center

Feb 25, 2016
Darko Stojanovich via Pixabay / Creative Commons

Budget woes at the New Mexico Department of Health are forcing a public health office in Albuquerque to close. 

The Alamosa Public Health clinic in southwest Albuquerque provides immunizations, STD screening, family planning and other services. Clients seeking help there are often low-income or uninsured.

Bothering Birds via Compfight CC

Albuquerque’s Environment Department has denied the permit for a company to build a hot-mix asphalt plant near a wildlife refuge in the South Valley.

The department was slated to hold hearings about the plant, but before those were set, found that Albuquerque Asphalt’s plan could generate contaminant levels that exceed air quality standards.

Bernalillo County rejected the application this week of a Florida company, Humic Growth Solutions, that wants to build a fertilizer plant next to a residential neighborhood south of Albuquerque.  

Zoning Administrator Juanita Garcia issued her decision Tuesday, saying the information the company provided in its application was too vague, and did not address the health and safety concerns of people living nearby.

Harvesting Health In The South Valley

May 6, 2015
Ed Williams

    

Santiago Maestas has been growing fruits and vegetables on a small plot of land in the South Valley for over 40 years. He's standing by a centuries-old acequia near Isleta Boulevard south of Albuquerque—a modest, earthen ditch carrying slow-moving irrigation water away from the Rio Grande and into fields and gardens.

fws.gov

  

Albuquerque’s Environmental Health Department is going to hold hearings on a proposal to build an around-the-clock hot-mix asphalt plant less than half a mile from the Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge in the South Valley. The department received 156 public comments on the plan.