Suicide

Adri De La Cruz


 As the summer season transitions into fall, it is important to note that September, the ninth month of the year, isn’t just for football and the start of school. It is also a month to raise awareness of suicide prevention and recovery. Both are already long-standing issues in our society—especially here in New Mexico. Coupled with the pandemics of COVID-19 and racism, hard feelings and thoughts can balloon. Left unattended or unnoticed, these issues lead to tragedy. But can we stop those tragedies before they happen? Talking things out and finding resources are two key solutions, and Episode 8 is full of options. This week we talk with counselors, therapists and people looking to help with an open ear, willing to hear about your problems and help you work through them. Because the world as it is today demands flexibility, but it’s tough to adjust to what you can’t see. 

 

natureaddict via Pixabay / Creative Commons

  

Albuquerque Public Schools is rolling out several new suicide prevention initiatives following a series of student deaths over the last year and calls from the community to do more. Amid concerns that district policy may deter students from talking to staff about thoughts of suicide, APS is partnering with Bernalillo County to roll out a peer support program in some schools.

Nash Jones / KUNM

  

For the second time in less than six months, people are calling on Albuquerque Public Schools to address the issue of suicide following more student deaths. The largest school district in the state has announced it’s rolling out new prevention initiatives, but students and advocates say more tracking and specialized support is needed.

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Latino youth are feeling psychological impacts of the Trump administration’s immigration crackdown, researchers say. A committee of legislators in New Mexico on Wednesday considered how this problem impacts the state and weighed increasing access to Medicaid.

May Ortega | KUNM

New Mexico has one of the highest suicide rates in the country. And more than half of those deaths involved a gun.

Some state lawmakers want to reduce suicides by confiscating guns from people who could pose a danger to themselves or others.

The measure’s known as a red flag law.

Bill Focuses On Guns, Suicide Prevention

Aug 8, 2018
Jens Lelie via Unsplash / Unsplash Attribution License

 

Nearly 500 New Mexicans died by suicide in 2015, and more than half of those deaths involved a gun. Lawmakers are looking at decreasing gun-related suicides in the state through a new bill.

pxhere / Creative Commons

June 16, 2018: New data shows suicide rate rising faster among women than men; Trailblazing basketball coach and player Anne Donovan dies; Tanzania removes tax from menstrual products; Haiti bans Oxfam for sexual misconduct; Domestic workers protest in Hong Kong; Federal officials deny they took breastfeeding infant away from woman at U.S. Mexico border; Gender wealth gap costs world $160 trillion; Lawsuit alleges lewd conduct by New Mexico State Police chief.

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There are fewer young people trying to commit suicide in New Mexico, according to the state Department of Health. Statewide rates of attempted suicide among school kids dropped 35 percent between 2003 and 2013.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

There have been more than 300,000 civilian gun deaths in the United States in the last 10 years. That’s right up there with the number of military casualties in the nation’s biggest wars.

Judge Rules Health Audit Can Remain Secret

Aug 14, 2014
Yuri Yu. Samoilov via Flickr / Creative Commons License

A state agency can continue to keep secret most of an audit it used last year to suspend funding for 15 health organizations and spark criminal investigations into potential Medicaid fraud, a judge ruled Thursday.

The ruling marks the second time in nine months that Douglas R. Driggers, a district judge in Doña Ana County, has agreed with the state’s Human Services Department (HSD) and Attorney General’s Office (AG) that protecting an ongoing criminal investigation trumps the public’s right to information.