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  Let’s Talk New Mexico 8/7 8am: This summer has marked big changes in the landscape of college athletics. From the NCAA allowing student-athletes to earn income based off of their name, image, and likeness, to major programs like the University of Texas and the University of Oklahoma moving conferences, college sports is now in a new era. How will this new terrain affect schools like the University of New Mexico and New Mexico State University? And what do the rising number COVID-19 cases mean for practices and games? On the next Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’ll be discussing what plans our state-run universities are making and how they are preparing to compete now and in the future. 

Courtesy UNM


  University Showcase, 7/16, 8a: The last year of the coronavirus pandemic has challenged communities all over the state. Last November, five students at the University of New Mexico began interviewing people about how they and their communities were coping in the pandemic and how they were forced to find their own resilience.

Hans via Pixabay

  The Colorado River provides water to 40 million people around the West, including New Mexico, but the historic drought gripping our region has prompted a 20 percent drop in flows in the river. Reservoirs are drying, with Lake Mead at its lowest levels since it was filled in the 1930s. As scientists incorporate these changes into future projections, an article in Science magazine urges them to plan for even greater declines in the river.

Jett Loe, UNM Health Sciences


  University Showcase, Friday 6/18 8a: As the coronavirus pandemic took hold in New Mexico in April 2020, Dr. Heather Jarrell stepped into a new role --- interim chief medical examiner at the Office of the Medical Investigator. On this episode, we talk with Dr. Jarrell about how the pandemic affected her office and staff, especially with the ongoing shortage of forensic pathologists here and around the country. She also talks about the need to recruit more young people into the field. 

University of New Mexico

University Showcase, Friday 5/21 8a: Each year the University of New Mexico recognizes a faculty member with its Community Engaged Research Lecture award. On this episode, Professor Jennifer Nez Denetdale from the American Studies Department talks about her lecture "Dikos Ntsaaígíí  ̶ Building the Perfect Human to Invade: A Diné Feminist Analysis of the Pandemic and the Navajo Nation.”

By ESA & MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 igo, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=56489423 / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/deed.en

University Showcase 4/16 8a: From "War of the Worlds" to "The Martian Chronicles," the planet Mars has long held a grip on our popular imagination. But where did these early ideas about vast networks of canals and advanced, and sometimes hostile, civilizations come from?  On this episode we explore the power of mapmaking to create reality, but also the tendency to work out our own problems on Earth by projecting them onto Mars.

Jose Antonio de Alzate y Ramirez, circa 1760

Let's Talk New Mexico 4/15 8am: The state of New Mexico, including land currently used by the University of New Mexico, occupies the traditional homelands of many Indigenous peoples. KUNM will soon be using a statement, known as a “land acknowledgement,” on our website along with  other documents that recognize and honor that history.

Dylan McLaughlin

What is the sound of a river in crisis? That’s what a group of artists explore in an installation opening online at the University of New Mexico Art Museum on World Water Day, March 22nd.

UNM Newsroom

 

Most students enrolled half-time or more in college typically aren't eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), sometimes known as food stamps. But temporary changes to the federal program are allowing some low-income students to take advantage during the pandemic.

Megan Kamerick


 


University Showcase, 2/19, 8a: On this episode we explore the concept or reparations with Kathy Powers, who has been studying transitional justice and reparations around the world for years. She’s an associate professor of political science at the University of New Mexico.

PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay / Creative Commons

Recent surveys show that the U.S. Latino population is skeptical and mistrusts the COVID-19 vaccine, with nearly 30% saying they are unlikely to get it. University of New Mexico Political Science professor and Director of the UNM Center for Social Policy Gabriel Sanchez co-authored a study published by the Brookings Institution last month that digs deeper into this data. The report highlights the historical roots of this fear, and makes recommendations for community-specific outreach efforts that could increase equity in vaccine distribution. Dr. Sanchez spoke with KUNM’s Nash Jones about the report and why some Latinos said they are reluctant to get the vaccine. 

Courtesy Running Medicine


University Showcase, Friday, 01/15, 8a:On this episode we talk with the group Running Medicine, which recently won a national award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that recognizes and honors those in sport who display an innovative and collaborative approach to making their communities healthier places to live. 

University Showcase Friday, 11/20, 8a: On this episode we meet Dr. Tracie Collins, the women selected this month by Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham to be the new secretary for the New Mexico Department of Health. Collins has served as Dean of the UNM College of Population Health since 2019.

Delaney Brigman


Many first time voters have a lot on their mind this election cycle. College students are coming of age in an unprecedented time, with the COVID-19 pandemic, civil uprisings for racial justice, and accelerating climate change. They're trying to figure it all out while keeping up with remote classes and assignments. As part of our Voices Behind the Vote series, UNM freshman Delaney Brigman spoke with KUNM about why voting is important to her and what young people want from their politicians. 

courtesy of Dr. Assata Zerai / University of New Mexico

On Wednesday, the University of New Mexico Board of Regents approved a new official seal design. The decision comes after years of advocacy by Native American students and faculty who said the old seal, featuring a conquistador and a frontiersman, celebrated genocide and colonial oppression. But the Regent’s final selection is not the design that won a popular vote, and that has many people feeling left out of what was supposed to be an inclusive process. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The University of New Mexico Board of Regents is expected to vote on Wednesday, Oct. 20 on a new official seal design. The move follows many years of campaigning by students and faculty with the UNM Kiva Club and the Red Nation, who say the old seal, depicting a frontiersman and a conquistador, celebrates genocide and conquest. But the old seal is far more the only symbol at UNM that reflects racism against Indigenous people, says Alysia Coriz, a Native American Studies major and co-president of the Kiva Club. She spoke with KUNM earlier this year about how she would like to see the university address other instances of racist imagery on campus, including places named after violent colonizers. 

  University Showcase Friday, 10/16, 8a: Young people who are caught up early in the justice system often face an array of challenges even before they get into trouble. Those can include untreated mental health problems, substance abuse and dysfunctional or violent home lives.

Nash Jones / KUNM

Half of the millennial and Generation Z voters under 30 who plan to cast their ballots for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden aren’t very enthusiastic about the candidate, according to a survey by the Harvard Kennedy School Institute of Politics. Reina Davis is a 23-year-old Albuquerque voter who, while not particularly excited about her options for president, sees voting as harm-reduction, and as one facet of fighting for reproductive justice, one of her priority issues.

University of New Mexico Press

  Friday, 9/18, 8a: On this episode we talk about the history of Art1 with art historian and author Patrick Frank. In the late 1960s, the University of New Mexico played a key role in bringing together creativity and technology in what was then the nascent field of computer art. Now a new book from Museum of New Mexico Press offers the first in depth account of this early digital creativity -- “Sharing Code: Art1, Frederick Hammersley, and the Dawn of Computer Art.” 

No More Normal: Mental Wellness

Sep 6, 2020
Adri De La Cruz


 As the summer season transitions into fall, it is important to note that September, the ninth month of the year, isn’t just for football and the start of school. It is also a month to raise awareness of suicide prevention and recovery. Both are already long-standing issues in our society—especially here in New Mexico. Coupled with the pandemics of COVID-19 and racism, hard feelings and thoughts can balloon. Left unattended or unnoticed, these issues lead to tragedy. But can we stop those tragedies before they happen? Talking things out and finding resources are two key solutions, and Episode 8 is full of options. This week we talk with counselors, therapists and people looking to help with an open ear, willing to hear about your problems and help you work through them. Because the world as it is today demands flexibility, but it’s tough to adjust to what you can’t see. 

 

No More Normal: This Will Be On The Exam

Aug 23, 2020
Photo by Nani Chacon

In the old days—like last year—mid-August was a time when students prepared to get back to class. A time to reconnect with friends and compare summer vacation stories and to show off the fashion of your new school outfits, if you were so lucky. In 2020, instead of students worrying about who has a crush on who, they’re thinking about who has COVID and who doesn't. Parents are concerned with how their kids will get a quality education. Teachers are not only focused on the adjustment to teaching remotely but on the health risks of being called back to campus. In Episode 6, we hear from a panel of teachers, students in three different levels of school, a union rep for college instructors, Khalil’s mom Olufemi Ekulona, as well as renowned anti-racism educator Jane Elliott. Break out your notebooks. There’s a lot to learn, and what is covered today will be on the exam.

Tom.Arthur via Flickr / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

Millions of Americans face losing their homes after the federal moratorium on evictions expired last month, and Congress adjourned this week without passing a new one. President Trump signed an executive order this week addressing evictions, but housing experts say it provides no real protection for most tenants. New Mexico’s moratorium on evictions is still in effect, but as University of New Mexico law professor Serge Martinez tells KUNM’s Megan Kamerick, it doesn’t apply to every situation.

It all started at Dr. Sanjeev Arora's clinic in New Mexico.

"One Friday afternoon, 18 years ago, I walked into my clinic in Albuquerque to see a 42-year-old woman who had driven five hours with her two children," Arora said before a recent Senate committee hearing.


Hannah Colton

University Showcase 7/17 8a: On this episode we talk with Associate Professor Finnie Coleman about the origins and the goals of the Black Lives Matter movement and how Afrofuturism can inform the creation of a more just society. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The student-run newspaper at the University of New Mexico ran an editorial last week calling out “Journalism’s problematic love affair with objectivity.” In it, the Daily Lobo’s editorial board argues that mainstream White-led news media often perpetuates racism and “actively sides with the oppressor,” and that one way reporters do that is by unquestioningly repeating police narratives.

Daily Lobo News Editor Lissa Knudsen spoke with KUNM News Director Hannah Colton about how she says a dedication to the notion of objectivity can lead reporters to obscure the truth.

Courtesy UNM Press


  Two years after he defeated the so-called “Great White Hope,” legendary boxer Jack Johnson fought another white challenger determined to topple him as heavyweight champion of the world. It took place on July 4, 1912 in Las Vegas, New Mexico, and is the subject of the book “Crazy Fourth: How Jack Johnson Kept His Title and Put Las Vegas New Mexico on the Map,”  just published by University of New Mexico Press.

Nash Jones / KUNM

Thousands participated in a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest in Albuquerque Sunday night in response to the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police. Organizers handed out bags of donation-funded supplies to help participants feel safer demonstrating during the pandemic. 

  

The FBI is investigating an online attack on a UNM professor last week that included a threat of lynching at his home. In response to the racist messages, UNM held a virtual town hall Tuesday featuring black faculty talking about ways to combat anti-blackness on campus.

Porapak Apichodilok via Pexels / Creative Commons

Most students at the University of New Mexico moved out of the dorms and began taking classes online the last week of March. For students experiencing domestic violence who moved back into abusive situations, or who are no longer leaving home to go to school, there are new barriers to getting support. The LoboRESPECT Advocacy Center is a confidential reporting site on campus for sexual and domestic violence that provides students support, education and resources. KUNM’s Nash Jones, who used to work at the center, spoke with Cole Carvour, the center’s Campus Advocate, about how the stay-at-home order is impacting student survivors and the services the center provides.


  University Showcase 2/21 8a: Alzheimer’s and dementia represent a growing crisis around the world and New Mexico faces many challenges in addressing these illnesses.

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