Verland Coker

Hannah Colton / KUNM

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Let's Talk New Mexico 6/25, 8a: Teachers, parents and students are facing tough questions about what classes will look like as the pandemic stretches into the fall. The struggle for equity in the system is ongoing; a judge next week could decide whether the state will stay under court order to fix racial and socioeconomic disparities. And some programs meant to serve marginalized students had their budgets cut in this week’s special legislative session. This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’re talking K-12 education, and we want to hear from you. What systemic changes do you want to see in public schools? Email letstalk@kunm.org, or call in live during the show at 277-5866.

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Let's Talk New Mexico 4/16, 8a: School staff around the state are racing to get meals, services and instruction to students stuck at home, but not all children have the tools or support they need to continue their learning. On this week’s call-in show, we’ll hear from educators about how they’re working to keep students engaged amid the public health crisis. How is the pandemic exacerbating long-standing inequities in New Mexico’s school system? How are districts working to overcome gaps in infrastructure like broadband access? What creative solutions are possible? Write us at letstalk@kunm.org or join the conversation by calling (505) 277-5866 during the show Thursday morning.

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Albuquerque Public Schools is rolling out several new suicide prevention initiatives following a series of student deaths over the last year and calls from the community to do more. Amid concerns that district policy may deter students from talking to staff about thoughts of suicide, APS is partnering with Bernalillo County to roll out a peer support program in some schools.

Nash Jones / KUNM

For the second time in less than six months, people are calling on Albuquerque Public Schools to address the issue of suicide following more student deaths. The largest school district in the state has announced it’s rolling out new prevention initiatives, but students and advocates say more tracking and specialized support is needed.

Hannah Colton / KUNM


    

New Mexico politicians paid lip service this election cycle to a landmark education ruling about inequities in public schools. But no one was drawing a line between the Yazzie-Martinez case and an issue that’s had students walking out of classes this fall – climate change. Verland Coker, a 26-year-old Albuquerque school board candidate, makes that connection, calling out the hypocrisy of an education system here that relies on oil and gas money.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Three school board seats in New Mexico’s largest district were up for grabs in this week’s election, as leaders across the state are still grappling with educational inequities surfaced by a lawsuit last year. Ballots were counted Tuesday night, and voters in Albuquerque re-elected all three sitting school board members. 

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The Albuquerque school board election this fall has six candidates vying for three seats. Candidates have raised tens of thousands of dollars, with the bulk of those campaign contributions coming from businesses and labor unions.