KUNM

May Ortega

Public Health New Mexico Reporter

May is a Texas native who came to New Mexico to begin her professional career as a journalist in early 2017. She previously worked as a technology and healthcare reporter with Albuquerque Business First and has held various internships with newspapers around the country.May joined KUNM's Public Health New Mexico team in early 2018. While print news has been her livelihood since her college days, she sees radio as a more intimate way to provide a platform for underrepresented voices.

May Ortega | KUNM

UPDATE 2/14 10:00a: New Mexico's House of Representatives passed HB83 - the Extreme Risk Firearm Protection Order Act - Wednesday with a 39 - 30 vote. It now goes to the state Senate for consideration. 

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New Mexico has one of the highest suicide rates in the country. And more than half of those deaths involved a gun.

Some state lawmakers want to reduce suicides by confiscating guns from people who could pose a danger to themselves or others. The measure’s known as a red flag law, and it is scheduled to be heard on the house floor Wednesday night.

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UPDATE 2/11: The Domestic Violence and Firearm Possession bill has made it past the state House floor and now heads to the Senate. 

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State lawmakers are considering a bill that would let residents who aren’t eligible for Medicaid coverage to buy into the program.

 

Nearly one million low-income New Mexicans were covered in 2017 when the state chipped in $1 billion of $5 billion for things like health care services.

Jens Lelie via Unsplash / Unsplash Attribution License


Lawmakers have advanced a package of gun control bills in the state legislature.

 

There are two bills that would expand background checks. Another would keep guns away from people convicted of domestic violence or who have a restraining order against them. And one is meant to prevent suicides.

May Ortega | KUNM

President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant policies have fueled anxiety among undocumented youth in New Mexico. There are local factors that cause stress, too, and there are a few things young folks can do that might help them feel better.

Carrie Jung via Flickr / Creative Commons License


Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham made it clear in her State of the State address today that she wants abortion to remain an option for New Mexico women.

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Paying bills during the partial government shutdown might be tough for federal workers who’ve been furloughed or who are showing up to work and not getting paid.

Several New Mexico utilities are working to relieve some of those worries.

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 As many as 800,000 federal employees aren’t getting paid during the partial government shutdown. And at least one local tribe is feeling those effects.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Creative Commons License

UPDATE 1/11: The Department of Health now says it'll be able to stretch its funds for the WIC program through April 2019.

makelessnoise via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Some kids have a hard time getting enough to eat while school is out for winter break. Albuquerque Public Schools will offer free meals for students starting Friday.

Courtesy UNM Midwives

 

Research has shown that newborns have healthier birth weights when their mothers receive proper prenatal care and that stress can contribute to early deliveries.

The University of New Mexico Hospital's CenteringPregnancy program for expecting mothers focuses on the social aspects of maternal health.

 

Kelly Gallagher, the head of the hospital’s Midwifery Division, is in charge of the program.

Creative Commons / Pixabay


The number of babies born dependent on drugs in New Mexico more than tripled between 2008 and 2017 according to new data from the state Department of Health.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

The National Institutes of Health is in Albuquerque this week for its All of Us Research Program to better tailor medical treatment to individual people.

Courtesy Heading Home NM

 

The city of Albuquerque has opened one of its emergency shelters early.

Temperatures will go down to the teens in Albuquerque tonight, according to the National Weather Service, and remain in the 20s overnight for the rest of the week.

Voters Remain Concerned About Divisiveness

Nov 7, 2018
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Many Democrats here were overjoyed by this election’s blue wave in New Mexico, but lots of people are still concerned about how divided the nation is.

May Ortega | KUNM

Libertarians in New Mexico didn’t do so well this election. None of the five candidates running for office here won their races.

But Senate candidate Gary Johnson is still optimistic.

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Are you trying to figure out how to get to the polls on Tuesday?

Some ride-sharing companies, cities and local political parties are offering free or discounted rides to polling stations on Election Day.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

Immigration is one of this election’s biggest issues.

Tammy WilkersonHill-Fisher teaches English as a second language with the Immigrant and Refugee Resource Village of Albuquerque, and that's definitely one of her biggest political drivers.

May Ortega | KUNM

Pedestrian safety has long been a point of concern for residents of southeast Albuquerque. Joanne Landry, president of the Trumbull Neighborhood Association, is hoping that a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will help make things safer and boost her community’s morale.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

Voters aged 18 to 35 usually have the country’s lowest turnout rate at the polls. But Tracy Chamberlin, a young manager for G by GUESS in the Coronado Center, has made it her goal to get her peers more involved in politics.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

Gun control is an issue driving at least one local to the polls and to an Albuquerque gun show.

Sebastian Pociecha via Unsplash / Unsplash License

 

Next month will see the first general election since the Las Vegas and Stoneman Douglas shootings. And New Mexico had a school shooting of its own in Aztec last December.

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The #MeToo movement has sparked national conversations around issues like harassment in the workplace and access to reproductive services.

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Dealing with Alzheimer’s disease can take a toll on people emotionally and financially. A local organization is giving a free class in Albuquerque on Thursday about how to handle your finances when dealing with Alzheimer’s.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

Opioid addiction comes with more than just physical symptoms. A big part of fighting for sobriety is recovering emotionally, and for different people, that part needs a different approach.

Bryce Dix

 

A recovery center for youths in Albuquerque is gearing up to open new housing next month specifically for girls and young women.

Fred Hsu via Flickr / Creative Commons Attribution License

 

Voters in Bernalillo County will see another bond question about a planned tiny home village for people experiencing homelessness on their ballots come November.

May Ortega | KUNM

Opponents of a planned project to house homeless people came out in force to a meeting Thursday night in the Four Hills neighborhood in southeast Albuquerque.

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Bernalillo County is planning to build a village of tiny homes for people experiencing homelessness. But it’s facing some opposition.

Jens Lelie via Unsplash / Unsplash Attribution License

 

Nearly 500 New Mexicans died by suicide in 2015, and more than half of those deaths involved a gun. Lawmakers are looking at decreasing gun-related suicides in the state through a new bill.

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