Stephanie Serrano

Stephanie Serrano is a senior at the University of Nevada, Reno and a Latina born and raised in Reno, Nevada. She joins KUNR as our bilingual news intern for the spring of 2017. It's a special position supported by the Pack Internship Grant Program, KUNR, and Noticiero Movil, a bilingual multimedia news source that's part of the Reynolds School of Journalism.

Stephanie lives by this quote: “Nothing great ever came from comfort zones.” She believes being Latina has helped her become an independent, self-motivated, and confident woman. Her culture, family and self-driven goals inspire her to be a better person each day.

As a bilingual journalist, she feels it is her duty to help people reach out of their bubble and voice their story through her. She has worked with Noticero Movil as a bilingual reporter and has won a National Hearst award for her work in journalism. She loves being able to speak two different languages because she can help two communities at the same time.

When she isn’t saving the world with her journalism career, she likes to invest her time in painting and drawing, spending time with her family, and playing with her two dogs.

Heat waves induced by climate change will threaten future agricultural crops at a faster rate than gradual global warming, according to a new study published in the Journal of the European Economic Association. Steve Miller, a UC Boulder assistant professor of environmental studies, was a lead researcher in the study.

The pandemic prompted a ton of people who were stuck at home to explore the world of gardening for the first time, and an upcoming webinar series aims to cultivate even more budding backyard growers.

A new campaign is putting pressure on Facebook to combat Spanish-language misinformation.

Last month, almost a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, Facebook cracked down on vaccine misinformation.

Yet another study is showing an alarming decline in butterflies across the warming American West.

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken the lives of more than 20,000 people across the Mountain West. One of those people was Belarmina Martinez, a mother of eight and an aunt to nearly 20 nieces and nephews. She loved her family, food and dancing the most.

Last week, Texas joined Montana and a handful of other states in lifting its statewide mask mandate, a move that runs counter to warnings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Over the weekend, the FDA approved a third COVID-19 vaccine. The single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which is 66% effective in preventing moderate to severe disease, promises to boost inoculation rates in Mountain West states, including rural areas. 

The pandemic's economic toll has left many in the Mountain West struggling to feed their families. In fact, Nevada and New Mexico have some of the highest rates of child food insecurity in the country, according to a report published last fall by the nonprofit Feeding America.

Latino and Black people are generally more vulnerable to COVID-19, yet they remain far less likely to have received a vaccine, according to the latest demographic data from the CDC.

As highly contagious coronavirus variants spread, health experts in the Mountain West and beyond are urging people to upgrade and double up their masks.

As soon as President Joe Biden stepped foot in the White House, he signed numerous executive orders, including one that calls on Congress to pass the U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021.

As President Joe Biden calls for a 100-day mask challenge, a new study finds the majority of adults in the U.S. still don't wear masks consistently when they socialize with people outside of their household.

A new report finds that pandemic-related job loss will cause twice as much chronic homelessness than the 2008 Great Recession, with Latinos and African Americans especially vulnerable.

Dulce Leyva is a bilingual contact tracer who lives in Reno, Nevada. Her job is to reach out to people who have tested positive for the novel coronavirus and make sure they're self-isolating. And she tries to help them remember who they've been around and could have been exposed to the virus.

It's been a tough year for gas and oil prices, but solar power has seen steady growth during this pandemic year. 

Indoor dining is allowed across the Mountain West. But new research shows that even with current social distancing guidelines, the coronavirus can spread easily inside restaurants.

New Mexico and Colorado put limitations in place back in the spring and summer, respectively. And Nevada recently tightened its capacity restrictions even further to 25%. 

Governors across the West are asking for federal support to ensure that wildfire restoration becomes a priority, just like wildfire suppression and mitigation efforts.

COVID-19 contact tracers continue to be in short supply. That’s especially true for bilingual ones.

Nevada recently hosted its annual rural health conference, with a particular focus on infrastructure as COVID-19 continues to ravage rural America.