Interior Department

THE OFFICE OF U.S. HOUSE REP. DEB HAALAND

 

 

New Mexico Congresswoman Deb Haaland is poised to become our nation's first Indigenous cabinet secretary. As some prominent Mountain West lawmakers oppose her confirmation to lead the U.S. Department of the Interior, many of their Indigenous constituents are pushing back.

The office of U.S. House Rep. Deb Haaland


Soon after she was elected as one of America's first Indigenous congresswomen in 2018, New Mexico Rep. Deb Haaland paid a visit to her constituents at the Pueblo of Sandia, just outside of Albuquerque. 

"She came to the Pueblo for one of our feast days," said Stephine Poston, a tribal citizen and advocate for Native women leadership. "And the young girls, a couple of them were following her around and she stopped to talk to them. It was an amazing thing to see and witness." 

Poston said Haaland may as well have been a celebrity to those girls, but she didn't act like one. 

"She's just that person who will stop and see you," Poston said. 

And she said that's how Pueblo people, and Indigenous people across the country, have been feeling since Haaland was nominated to lead the Department of the Interior: Seen.

The Interior Department is facing criticism for putting up barriers to conservation projects nationwide funded through the new Great American Outdoors Act.

Pixabay via CC

The vice president of the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute has been accused of sexual assault by a staff member. Other complaints about Eric Christensen’s behavior have been filed over the course of his long federal career, according to a recent news story in Government Executive, an independent news publication.

Lisa Phillips, BLM Las Cruces District Rangeland Management Specialist via Wikimedia / Bureau of Land Management

KUNM Call In Show 6/29 8a: President Donald Trump has called for a review of more than two dozen national monuments that were designated under the American Antiquities Act of 1906. That includes the Rio Grande del Norte Monument near Taos and the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Monument near Las Cruces. Advocates say the sites need protection and have boosted tourism in rural areas. Ranchers and others worry about more federal limits on land use.

Judge Says No To New Gambling Compact For Pojoaque Pueblo

Oct 18, 2014
Prayitno via Flickr / Creative Commons

A federal judge has ruled against a New Mexico tribe trying to obtain a new gambling compact from the Interior Department.

U. S. District Judge James Parker on Friday invalidated Interior Department regulations that allow a tribe to go to the agency for a gambling agreement when it's failed to negotiate a compact with the state.

Pojoaque Gov. George Rivera says the tribe is considering an appeal of the decision.