Taxes

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham's Facebook page

  The national unemployment rate dropped in July to just over 10%, while New Mexico’s unemployment rate rose in that period to just over 12%. One reason is that people who were temporarily furloughed are now actually looking for jobs. That’s according to New Mexico Workforce Solutions Secretary Bill McCamley. He told  KUNM’s Khalil Ekulona that  while New Mexico’s unemployment trust fund will likely be depleted this month, his department has borrowed money from the federal government to extend the availability of benefits.

John Miller via Pixabay / Creative Commons

A bill that would legalize recreational marijuana in New Mexico stalled in the Senate last year. Over the summer, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham convened a work group to study the issue and gather public comment, and the group released recommendations for legalization that—among other things—prioritized equity for people who have been disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs. Rep. Javier Martínez, one of the sponsors of this year’s bill, spoke with KUNM about this year’s proposal, which passed out of the Senate Public Affairs Committee on a 4-3 party-line vote Tuesday, Jan. 28. 

Bryce Dix / KUNM

On a chilly night deep in the South Valley right along the Albuquerque city limits, a group of people dressed in heavy coats gathered on a street corner. These residents of the Vecinos del Bosque neighborhood gathered to protest a new co-housing development project that would put 27 new houses between their historic neighborhood and the Rio Grande. They waved flashlights on their signs for cars passing by. One read ‘plant trees not condominiums.’

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Voter turnout was high around the state on Tuesday, Nov. 5, as people cast ballots for their local leaders. In Albuquerque, even though there were contested City Council races, some folks said they mostly went to the polls to weigh in on bonds and taxes for public education. 

Alcohol Death Rate Rises In N.M.

Sep 25, 2019
Thomas Picauly via Unsplash / Unsplash license


New Mexico has had the country’s highest rate of alcohol-related deaths for more than 20 years. And last year it only got worse.

 

Arianna Sena/KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 3/14 8a: The 2019 state legislative session ends this weekend and lawmakers have been busy. Background checks for gun sales, recreational cannabis, funding for early childhood education, an ethics commission - what have lawmakers done this year - and what have they set aside? We talked with reporters who've been covering the session. 

Michael Newman / via Flickr

Santa Fe residents are voting on whether to renew funding for computer and technology access for schools. The special mail-in election ends next Tuesday, March 5.

FastilyClone via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons License

New Mexico legislators on Wednesday debated eliminating the state’s sales tax on so-called feminine hygiene products, like tampons and pads. Countries around the world have reduced or eliminated these taxes, and at least 10 states in the U.S. have done away with them, too.

Albuquerque City Councilors Approve Tax Increase

Mar 6, 2018
Debernardi via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons


The Albuquerque city council voted to raise gross receipts taxes by 0.375 percent Monday night and balance the city’s budget for the next year. The measure would generate around $50 million.

Governor Martinez Restores University Funds, Vetoes Taxes

May 27, 2017
Heath Haussamen / New Mexico In Depth

Republican New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez restored funding Friday to all state colleges and universities that she had vetoed earlier by tapping money from suspended infrastructure projects, while rejecting a string of tax increases proposed by the Democratic-led Legislature.

Governor Martinez Draws Line Against Tax-And-Spend Bills

Apr 8, 2017
Heath Haussamen

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez stripped all funding for the state Legislature along with state universities and colleges from a proposed budget for the coming fiscal year, using her veto pen Friday to escalate a confrontation with lawmakers over how to shore up shaky state finances.

LISTEN: How Should New Mexico Fix Its Budget?

Jan 24, 2017
Illustration by ccPixs.com

 

KUNM Call In Show 1/26 8a: Lawmakers have converged on Santa Fe for a two-month session during which their most pressing problem will be fixing a big hole in the state’s budget. This week we’ll talk about the governor’s proposal to cut already trimmed state funding and ask state employees to pay more into their retirement funds. We'll hear from Democratic lawmakers who say it’s not fair to make workers pay more before eliminating tax breaks for the wealthy and big business. 

Bid To Raise Gas Tax Stalls Over Politics

Mar 4, 2016
https://www.flickr.com/photos/87913776@N00/460375914

Over the past few years New Mexico has used short-term solutions to balance the budget without raising taxes. But if oil and gas prices stay low, it will become more and more of a challenge to find the money the state needs to pay the bills.

Raising at least some taxes might not be politically popular, but Sen. John Arthur Smith, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, argues it’s the fiscally conservative thing to do. And he wants to start with the gas tax.

thetutoress.com / Creative Commons License

The Bernalillo County Commission voted last night to postpone a tax hike for a special session that will likely happen next week. The one-quarter of 1 percent tax increase on goods and services would be divided up as follows: Half of it would go to mental health and substance abuse treatment services, and half of it would go to the county’s operational budget.

Biz Report: Staying in NM and Solar Industry Woes

Oct 14, 2011
Andreas Demmelbauer / Creative Commons License

A New Mexico company rejects tax incentives to leave the state and the solar industry takes a hit in the international market.