Nash Jones

Morning Edition Host

Nash Jones grew up in Albuquerque and returned home in 2017 after 11 years away living in Portland, OR, and Oakland, CA. Storytelling has consistently been at the core of Nash’s varied career and is in part what brought them to KUNM, first as an on-air volunteer with Spoken Word Hour and Weekend Edition, and now as the host of Morning Edition.

 

Nash has utilized storytelling in the fields of training and community education, student and youth development, and strategic communication consultation. Nash also performs as a personal storyteller, is the Vice President of the Board of Directors at Storytellers of New Mexico, a statewide nonprofit, and is the founder, producer, and host of Duke City Story Slam, a monthly live storytelling event in downtown Albuquerque.

 

They are passionate about public radio and enjoy helping KUNM listeners across New Mexico wake up and stay informed as the local anchor of Morning Edition.

  

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The statewide stay-at-home order announced by Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham on March 23 orders all "non-essential” businesses to close until April 10, in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Farmers’ markets are considered “essential businesses” under the order and can remain open. Albuquerque’s Downtown Growers’ Market is now hoping to open on its original start date of April 18, with certain adjustments, which means local artisans are likely out of luck this season. 

Nash Jones / KUNM

The New Mexico Department of Health on Mar. 13 restricted visitation to nursing facilities, whose residents are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. New Mexicans with loved ones who they can’t see now say communication, both from the facility and with their relatives, has been mixed.

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jared Duhon

Coronavirus Cases Jump To 23 As National Guard Delivers FoodAlbuquerque Journal, Associated Press

Health officials say two more people in New Mexico have tested positive for the coronavirus. A man in Taos County in his 50s and man in Santa Fe County in his 40s both recently tested positive for COVID-19.

Nash Jones / KUNM

The New Mexico Department of Health Sunday, Mar. 16, announced amendments to the public health order to slow the spread of COVID-19. The changes involve new rules for restaurants, including staying at or below half occupancy, having no more than six people at a table, and positioning the tables at least six feet apart. Local restaurants in Albuquerque’s International District are working to comply with the order while weathering a significant drop in business.

Courtesy City of Albuquerque

The standard bus fare in Albuquerque is a dollar, or two bucks for a day pass. Community advocates have long called on the city to make the busses free and the city’s Transit Advisory Board is now doing the same. The board unanimously passed a resolution last month calling for the city to eliminate fares for everyone, including both youth and adults. Now, the City Council has joined in by including a “fare-free” model in the budget priorities it sent to Mayor Tim Keller last week. KUNM’s Nash Jones spoke with Israel Chávez, Chair of the City’s Transit Advisory Board, about how it would work. 

Nash Jones / KUNM

After more than three years of planning, Bernalillo County and community partners gathered on Tuesday, March 10, to break ground at the Albuquerque Indian Center. That’s the site of the new Tiny Home Village, a community of 30 120 sq. ft. homes for those experiencing homelessness. After other neighborhoods considered for the project pushed back, lawmakers and community members say the International District is welcoming its new neighbors.

natureaddict via Pixabay / Creative Commons

Albuquerque Public Schools is rolling out several new suicide prevention initiatives following a series of student deaths over the last year and calls from the community to do more. Amid concerns that district policy may deter students from talking to staff about thoughts of suicide, APS is partnering with Bernalillo County to roll out a peer support program in some schools.

Pxhere / Creative Commons

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for New Mexicans ages 10-34 years and the numbers are rising, especially among teenagers, according to the New Mexico Department of Health. The City of Albuquerque is partnering with the state to provide mental health intervention training to the public.

Nash Jones / KUNM

For the second time in less than six months, people are calling on Albuquerque Public Schools to address the issue of suicide following more student deaths. The largest school district in the state has announced it’s rolling out new prevention initiatives, but students and advocates say more tracking and specialized support is needed.

Lindsay Fox via Flickr / Creative Commons

New Mexico lawmakers amended the proposed Tobacco Products Act on Wednesday, Feb. 12, to make the new regulations friendlier to retailers, including reducing licensing fees and eliminating criminal penalties.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

New Mexico Senators asked a local news reporter to leave a committee meeting Thursday at the Roundhouse, citing a Senate rule that bars recording these public meetings without permission from the head of the committee. 

Lawyers say this may be a violation of First Amendment freedom of the press, and some lawmakers want the rule changed to allow full transparency. 

H. Zell via Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons

Hemp was legalized in last year’s legislative session and this year, a bill that would legalize recreational marijuana is moving through the Legislature. The new hemp farms in New Mexico could pose a risk to outdoor marijuana crops.

Hemp and marijuana are different strains of the same plant. However, Jill Browning, chairwoman of the New Mexico Hemp Association, says the two industries differ in how they grow, produce and manufacture their products. “There is one thing that overlaps, and that is pollenization," she said.

John Miller via Pixabay / Creative Commons

A bill that would legalize recreational marijuana in New Mexico stalled in the Senate last year. Over the summer, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham convened a work group to study the issue and gather public comment, and the group released recommendations for legalization that—among other things—prioritized equity for people who have been disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs. Rep. Javier Martínez, one of the sponsors of this year’s bill, spoke with KUNM about this year’s proposal, which passed out of the Senate Public Affairs Committee on a 4-3 party-line vote Tuesday, Jan. 28. 

Wikimedia commons via CC

A lot of eyes are on recreational mairjuana in New Mexico this legislative session. Last year, a bill that regulated Hemp—the non-psychoactive strain of the cannabis plant—was signed into law. Hemp can be used to make thousands of products, like clothes, paper, biofuel and CBD oil. Farmers and advocates spoke about the burgeoning industry at the Roundhouse Thursday, Jan. 23.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

Recreational marijuana is legal in 11 states. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, who released her priorities this week for the upcoming legislative session, is pushing for New Mexico to be next.

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