KUNM

agriculture

SupportPDX Via Flickr

Farming and ranching generate nearly half of the agricultural and food processing industry’s revenue in New Mexico - about 4 billion dollars a year. A program that aims to help farmers and ranchers boost crop numbers and protect habitats for wildlife is getting an update. Now, the public can weigh in. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

The South Valley near Albuquerque has a long history of agricultural practice. Friday, October 4, marked the grand opening of a state-of-the-art greenhouse that will help local farmers and serve as a site where young people can learn the tradition. The shared greenhouse is the first of its kind, and it sits on land that was once an illegal dumpsite.

Let's Talk New Mexico's Wet Spring

May 22, 2019
OpenThreads via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let's Talk New Mexico 5/23 8a: Higher than average rainfall and snowpack means we're experiencing one of its wettest springs in decades. The Rio Grande is running ten times higher than it was at this time during last year's drought. So much water increases flood risks and challenges us to remain conservation minded. Has all the rain changed your plans for farming or planting gardens? How are you remaining water conscious? Do you plan to go river rafting or sailing on one of our state’s lakes this year? Email LetsTalk@KUNM.org, tweet us using the hashtag #LetsTalkNM or call in live during the show.

stlbites.com via Flickr / Creative Commons License

Let’s Talk New Mexico 3/21 8a: It’s spring, so planting, sprouting and growing are on the agenda. We’ll look at how farmers are bringing traditional agricultural practices into their fields. We’ll explore what we can learn from past generations about sustainability and talk about local programs to support this kind of work. We want to hear from you! Are you a small farmer or home gardener? What sort of tips do you have to share with aspiring growers? Does your family use heirloom seeds? How did your grandparents teach you to grow food Email LetsTalk@KUNM.org or call in live during the show.

Farmer Plants His Life In Harvest Cycle

Jul 24, 2018
Melorie Begay

Life for a farmer revolves around the changing of the season, but one Albuquerque farmer’s developed an even deeper relationship with the cycle. 

In Deep Water

Jan 10, 2018
Laura Paskus

As severe drought returns to New Mexico, farmers and skiers alike fret over the state’s lack of snow. Meanwhile, on a cold, cloudy Monday morning in Washington, DC, attorneys for New Mexico, Texas, Colorado and the United States government grappled over the muddy waters of the Rio Grande.

Leah Todd

Let’s Talk New Mexico 10/26 8a: In New Mexico and across the West, economies are changing. From agriculture to tech startups, health care and business on tribal lands, communities in New Mexico are working to adapt. 

This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’re looking at communities who are coming up with solutions to the economic changes our state is facing as part of our collaboration with the Solutions Journalism Network's State of Change project. 

Community Farm Puts Down Roots In South Valley

Jul 11, 2017
Pixabay via Public Domain

The South Valley near Albuquerque is seeing an agricultural renaissance of sorts. First Choice Community Healthcare just broke ground today on a community farm there. Advocates are fixing their attention on local food as a form of preventative health care.

Local government has to provide millions of meals every year to schools and to people who are incarcerated. It’s big money for whoever’s providing that food. The state auditor found it’s mostly national companies that get those multi-million-dollar food contracts.

The Future of New Mexico Wine

Nov 14, 2016

KUNM Call In Show 11/17 8a: New Mexicans have been growing grapes for more than 400 years. Wine is a part of our religious and cultural history--but what part will it play in our future? 

Rio Grande Community Farms

10/29 Sat 9a:  The KUNM Kids will be getting lost, and hopefully found, in the Rio Grande Community Farms Corn Maze. We'll send kids into the maze with a portable transmitter and a microphone to find their way through.  

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

It’s been two weeks since the Gold King Mine spill closed irrigation on the Navajo Nation and officials say fields around Shiprock are beginning to die off. Farmers there want to know when they’ll be able to water their crops again.    

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

It’s been nearly two weeks since the Gold King Mine spill caused the shut down of San Juan River irrigation to farms on the Navajo Nation. Emergency stopgap measures aren’t quite panning out. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Update Aug. 18, 11:30 a.m.: The EPA said the water for the Navajo Nation came from nearby Bloomfield and met state and federal quality standards. The trucks came from a division of an Aztec, N.M.-based company, Triple S Trucking, that moves non-potable water. The company also hauls fluids to and from oil fields. KUNM awaits comment from Triple S. 

After Plume Passes, Attention Turns To Sediments

Aug 14, 2015
Rita Daniels/KUNM


Water managers in Northwestern New Mexico are trying to figure out how much contamination from the Gold King Mine spill has seeped into ditch irrigation systems. 

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