KUNM

Tim Keller

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham ordered dozens of state police officers to come to Albuquerque as part of a surge aimed at slowing violent crime after a baseball player for the University of New Mexico was killed in Nob Hill. Residents talked about the impact of their presence in a predominantly minority Southeastern neighborhood that they say has a history of being overpoliced.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Albuquerque Mayor Tim Keller got on a truck lift on Wednesday, May 8, and turned on a streetlight in the International District in a photo-op designed to announce that PNM will replace all of its streetlight bulbs with energy-efficient LEDs by the end of 2019. It’s still unclear when the area’s ongoing problem with broken streetlights and bad lighting will be resolved.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

At night, for long stretches of road on large busy streets and residential ones, it’s completely dark in Southeast Albuquerque’s International District. Residents say not having enough streetlights is an urgent problem, because it leads to hotspots of crime and more vehicles hitting pedestrians. Politicians failed to spend hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars for new lights in the area, leaving neighborhoods in the dark.

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More folks are experiencing homelessness around the country, and Albuquerque’s mayor says the numbers are up here, too. Mayor Tim Keller talked about the pros and cons of what his predecessor Richard Berry rolled out, and how the city can create a system that’s easy to navigate for people who don’t have a place to live.

Megan Kamerick / KUNM

Millions in federal funding has been up in the air for the Albuquerque Rapid Transit system, or ART, since its construction in 2016. The money’s now a sure thing. Mayor Tim Keller announced on Tuesday the Federal Transit Authority will be pitching in $75 million for the ART line. 

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There could be more peace of mind for people in Albuquerque who don’t qualify for the state’s medical cannabis program if Mayor Tim Keller signs a measure city councilors passed on Monday. It would decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis.

 

Albuquerque City Councilors Approve Tax Increase

Mar 6, 2018
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The Albuquerque city council voted to raise gross receipts taxes by 0.375 percent Monday night and balance the city’s budget for the next year. The measure would generate around $50 million.

Victor Onimole / KUNM

Construction workers tore up Albuquerque’s main avenue for well over a year installing ART, or Albuquerque Rapid Transit. And even though the new stations light up at night, the system isn’t working. The city’s new mayor said at a news conference on Tuesday, Jan. 9, that ART has a ways to go before it’s operational. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

After an extra long campaign season in Albuquerque, voters gave Democrat Tim Keller a big win in last night’s runoff mayoral election against Republican Dan Lewis. Keller said the high voter turnout and decisive victory constitutes a mandate. 

Early Voting for ABQ Runoff Election Underway

Nov 2, 2017
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Early voting for the runoff election for Albuquerque’s mayor and the District 5 City Council seat is open. Since no mayoral candidate took half the vote in October, Dan Lewis and Tim Keller are going head-to-head.

ABQ Voter Registration Closing Soon

Oct 12, 2017
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Millennials are some of the least likely people to vote in city elections Ramon Montoya, a member of the New Mexico Voter Registration Group, said. The group is working to register as many residents as possible including young adults. 

Keller And Lewis Faceoff For ABQ Mayor

Oct 4, 2017
Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Voters whittled the eight-candidate ballot for mayor down to just two contenders: state Auditor Tim Keller and Westside City Councilor Dan Lewis. About 97,000 people voted in Albuquerque’s election on Tuesday, Oct. 3, and that’s significantly more ballots than the dismal citywide election four years ago.  "Today citizens of our city came out to vote like they haven’t in a long time," Keller told a crowd of supporters.

Runoff Likely In Albuquerque Mayor's Race

Sep 28, 2017
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Of the seven candidates running in Albuquerque’s mayoral race, none are likely to have the 50 percent of the vote needed to win Tuesday’s election, according to polls.

While Tim Keller led in three different polls from the Albuquerque Journal, KOB-TV and KRQE-TV, UNM Political Science Professor Gabe Sanchez said Keller probably wouldn’t get enough votes to win on Oct. 3.

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Let’s Talk New Mexico 9/21 8a: It’s the No. 1 issue on voters’ minds heading into the municipal election on October 3. Some mayoral and Council candidates in Albuquerque are calling for more police officers on the force and a new police chief. What do you think it will take to decrease the number of violent crimes and property crimes?

Local government has to provide millions of meals every year to schools and to people who are incarcerated. It’s big money for whoever’s providing that food. The state auditor found it’s mostly national companies that get those multi-million-dollar food contracts.

Laura Paskus / KUNM

When disaster strikes New Mexico, the federal government sends money to New Mexico’s Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Journalist Laura Paskus of NMpoliticalreport.com reported a few months ago that the state did not release tens of millions of dollars to local contractors.

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After last year’s fatiguing election cycle, candidates in Albuquerque are gearing up for another one: The 2017 race for mayor. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

We call the thousands of sexual assault evidence kits in New Mexico a backlog. But as the state Auditor’s Office pointed out in an audit last week, it’s not like there’s just a long line of envelopes at the labs waiting to be tested. Actually, the kits have been sitting around law enforcement departments all over the state for decades. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

New Mexico has one of the worst sexual assault rates in the nation. And thousands of envelopes of DNA evidence that could help identify repeat sexual offenders are sitting untested. We're taking a look at what it takes for survivors to provide that evidence in the first place.

Sarah Trujillo

It’s been almost a year since the New Mexico state auditor’s office announced a special audit of untested sexual assault kits, but law enforcement agencies across the state have made little progress. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

All around the country, states are trying to address a mounting number of untested sexual assault evidence kits. And even though New Mexico’s budget is tight, the Legislature found $1.6 million to work through the backlog here. At a meeting in Albuquerque on Monday, stakeholders gathered to talk about what’s next.

Auditor To Governor: Move On Unspent Money

Feb 12, 2016
Gwyneth Doland

The state auditor released a report Friday showing about $4 billion is sitting around across the state unspent—but it’s unclear whether that money could help with the current budget shortfall vexing lawmakers in Santa Fe.

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An audit released today found weaknesses and deficiencies when it comes to funding requirements for special education.