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Let's Talk medically assisted treatment for addiction in jails

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Medically assisted treatment is currently the number one recommended evidence based standard of care for those suffering from opioid use disorder, yet fewer than 200 of the thousands of correctional facilities across the US offer

Let’s Talk New Mexico 1/12 8am: Medications like methadone and suboxone could help save lives, and increase people’s chances of entering into, or staying in recovery when given to people in prison or jail. Moreover, the department of justice recently released guidance that denying these treatments could be considered a violation of the Americans with Disabilities act. Plus they reduce recidivism, and lower costs. So why is it still so rare to see these medications offered when someone ends up behind bars?

On the next Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’ll talk about medically assisted treatment for opioid use disorders in correctional facilities. We’ll speak with a doctor who is trying to change state law to make access to medically assisted treatment standard for all prisoners, and a lawyer who’s part of a case that says MAT is a civil right. We’ll also speak with the state corrections department about what addiction treatments they do offer and how that may change in the future.

And we want to hear from you as well! Are you or a loved one on these medications? What would it mean to lose access to them?

Email us at letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet at us using #letstalkNM, or call in live during the show.

GUESTS:

  • Dr. Nathan Birnbaum, M.D., Assistant Professor of Family and Community Medicine, UNM
  • Lalita Moskowitz, Litigation Manager ACLU of NM, Adjunct Prof, UNM School of Law
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