Andy Lyman

My 420 Tours via Flickr / Creative Commons . https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

Let’s Talk New Mexico 12/2 8am: It’s been five months since recreational cannabis was legalized in New Mexico with retail sales slated to start on April 1, 2022. So where do things stand? The state Regulation and Licensing Department has been holding public hearings as it  promulgates rules to regulate the new industry. Some would-be entrepreneurs have run into challenges getting licensed and started. Lawmakers have approved a loan program for microbusinesses through the New Mexico Finance Authority. The Cannabis Regulatory Advisory Committee is working on a plan to promote equity. And state officials have identified at least 150,000 people who may be eligible for automatic expungement for some past marijuana offenses. 

My 420 Tours via Wikimedia / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

  On March 30, the New Mexico Legislature convenes for a special session to focus on legalizing cannabis. A bill made it past the House in the regular session but stalled in the Senate. Reporter Natalie Fertig with Politico covers cannabis policy around the country and has been closely watching the process in New Mexico. She spoke with KUNM's Megan Kamerick her along with my co-host Andy Lyman from New Mexico Political Report for the podcast “Growing Forward: Cannabis and New Mexico.”

Cannabis Reports via Flickr / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The New Mexico Legislature failed to pass a bill legalizing recreational cannabis before the 2021 session ended on March 20. Now Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has called a special session for March 30 to take up the issue. But advocates for traditional and rural communities say despite the equity provisions in the bill that died, there was not enough consideration of impacts on rural communities.

Your NM Government: Roundhouse Update | 3.18.21

Mar 18, 2021
kym mackinnon

 

Your NM Government: Roundhouse Update | 3.10.21

Mar 10, 2021
New Mexico PBS

 

 

And then there were 2 --- cannabis legalization bills. At least that's the way things seem to be shaping up in this 2021 Legislative Session. 

My 420 Tours via Flickr / Creative Commons . https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

  A total of five bills have been introduced in this year's legislative session to legalize recreational cannabis. Despite this being a legislative priority, the New Mexico Senate only began debate on bills on February 27. Meanwhile, House Bill 12 passed the full House and has moved to the Senate.

But the clock is ticking for legalization to happen this year, with the session ending on March 20. KUNM's Megan Kamerick spoke with Andy Lyman with New Mexico Political Report, her co-host on the New Mexico PBS podcast “Growing Forward: Cannabis in New Mexico” to get an update on where things stand and why this push is happening so late in the 60-day session. The Senate Tax, Business and Transportation Committee was slated to take up debate on Saturday, March 6, on recreational cannabis legalization bills. They have since rescheduled that for Tuesday, March 9.

Marisa Demarco


Let’s Talk New Mexico 1/21 8am: Last week, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham released her list of top legislative priorities for the year. The Governor and legislators, for the most part, agree the focus will be on pandemic recovery. That can mean new spending and creating new revenue streams, and that spending and fundraising will impact New Mexicans in a myriad of ways. Lujan Grisham asked legislators to legalize recreational marijuana, help make health insurance more affordable and to take a stand against greenhouse emissions. Legislators and interest groups have other plans to address climate change, public health and education.

YNMG & COVID: The Doors Are Locked

Jun 19, 2020

In episode 78 we discuss what’s happening in Santa Fe at the legislative special session. It’s a unique situation up there; COVID-19 precautions have led to a locked-in session with no opportunity for citizens to attend in person. But first, we hear from organizers of the Albuquerque Juneteenth celebration commemorating 155 years since the official end of slavery in Texas, with the entire United States following soon after.