Immigration

Laura Paskus

An overwhelming majority of scientists agree that human-caused climate change is real. And along with more heat, drought and wildfires, we are facing an increase in forced migration – people fleeing their home countries for U.S. borders when they lose their crops or conditions become unlivable. No More Normal host Khalil Ekulona spoke with environmental reporter Laura Paskus about how New Mexicans should be preparing for this future, especially when it comes to water use. She says the Albuquerque stretch of the Rio Grande is critically low and could even stop flowing this month.

A U.S. Postal Service employee faces jail time after allegedly throwing out critical immigration documents.


Bryce Dix / KUNM

Episode 39 is focused on migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees in our communities, and on Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention centers, which are often overcrowded around the United States and are criticized for bad medical care. ICE announced it will review cases one-by-one and release vulnerable people. Officials and advocates say that's not anywhere near fast enough as COVID cases are cropping up around the country in ICE detention centers, and outbreaks in them could overwhelm regional hospitals.

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  Let's Talk New Mexico 1/16 8a: We’re going to look back at the local news stories that affected New Mexicans last year and at how they might develop in the year ahead. And we’re going to talk about how these topics will impact the upcoming legislative session. Our guests will walk us through their picks for the most notable, important or interesting news stories they covered in 2019—from immigration to liver transplants to education—and how it made a difference to the people who live in our state.

 

And we want to hear from you! What New Mexico news stories stood out for you in 2019? Or what national events affected your life? Email Letstalk@KUNM.org, tweet us at #LetsTalkNM, or call in live during the show.

 

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Latino youth are feeling psychological impacts of the Trump administration’s immigration crackdown, researchers say. A committee of legislators in New Mexico on Wednesday considered how this problem impacts the state and weighed increasing access to Medicaid.

Courtesy of the New Mexico Motor Vehicle Division

Driver’s licenses have been a political football in New Mexico going on a decade now. And for the last couple of years, the state was instead issuing driver authorization cards to people in the country without legal permission—or to other folks who didn’t want a federally compliant Real ID. Tuesday, Oct. 1, marked a rollback of that policy, and anyone who isn’t seeking a Real ID can once again get a standard state driver’s license.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

A sea of red hats and red shirts surrounded the Santa Ana Star Center in Rio Rancho last night as Trump supporters gathered to chant and shout their patriotism. When he came three years ago, headlines highlighted the violent reaction to his visit to Albuquerque, though hundreds had protested peacefully for hours before that went down. This time, his campaign painted New Mexico as a winnable swing state, saying he had growing support among Hispanic voters. 

8.25.19 - Close the Camps Report Back

Sep 16, 2019

08/25 7p: In July, DHS prepared to detain hundreds of immigrant children and families at the Fort Sill Military Base in Lawton, Oklahoma. At the same, hundreds of organizers, activists, and protestors from around the country gathered to hold peaceful resistance at Fort Sill in an effort to "Close the Camps."

 Jonathon Alonzo, co-President of Fight For Our Lives Albuquerque, Annarae Serrano, Freshman at Fort Lewis College, and Eli Cuna, National Field Director for United We Dream, join us to discuss the action that received national attention. 

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The Trump administration has issued a new rule that could deny visas and green cards to some immigrants if they use government assistance programs like Medicaid or food assistance, citing the need for self-sufficiency and the cost.

Ed Williams / KUNM

Thousands of people have come forward with complaints about sexual abuse inside immigration detention facilities—including children. But few have ever been investigated.

Now, organizations representing survivors are demanding that detention centers enforce federal laws against abuse of prisoners and stop separating families, which they say makes kids vulnerable to assault.

KUNM spoke with longtime advocate and attorney Claire Harwell of the New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs. Harwell says asylum-seekers are often fleeing sexual violence in other countries before they’re locked up in U.S. facilities, where they may face the the same violence.

Liam James Doyle/NPR

After an inspector general report found "dangerous overcrowding" at Border Patrol facilities, the House oversight committee is holding a hearing about conditions for detained migrants. Watch the hearing live.

Bryce Dix/KUNM

Hundreds of protesters gathered Tuesday in downtown Albuquerque to demand an end to inhumane conditions in detention centers at the U.S.-Mexico border. It was part of a nationwide response to federal immigration policies that have separated family members, led to migrant deaths in detention and sought to limit who can seek asylum in the U.S.

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday, June 27, rejected the Trump administration’s attempt to add a citizenship question to next year’s census. New Mexico advocates are relieved by the decision but say there will still be plenty of hurdles to getting an accurate picture of who’s in the state.

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President Donald Trump just launched his re-election campaign, and he also Tweeted that starting next week, there would be mass arrests based on immigration violations. This comes as detention centers around the country are over-capacity and accused of violating basic human rights. Families in New Mexico are feeling the impact of that familiar and uncertain threat.

Noah Fortson/NPR

President Trump is unveiling an immigration plan that would vastly change who's allowed into the United States. The administration's proposal focuses on reducing family-based immigration to the U.S. in favor of employment skill-based immigration. Watch his remarks from the White House Rose Garden live. 

Courtesy Bobbie MacKenzie

City officials in Las Cruces say they’ve accepted hundreds of asylum seekers released from detention in just over a week. Those folks might need to see a doctor, a therapist or simply have a warm meal.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection / Creative Commons


The United States Border Patrol has closed all five of its New Mexico highway checkpoints, and one in west Texas.

 

The agents are being relocated to assist with the processing and transportation of an influx of migrants at the border.

Ed Williams / KUNM

Nationally, Immigration and Customs Enforcement held 42,000 people in custody on average on any given day last year. People leaving ICE detention often say conditions were bad, and they were abused or didn’t get enough to eat. Some New Mexico lawmakers are carrying a bill that might create a window into ICE facilities here.

May Ortega | KUNM

President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant policies have fueled anxiety among undocumented youth in New Mexico. There are local factors that cause stress, too, and there are a few things young folks can do that might help them feel better.

Joe Gratz via Flickr CC

Nationally, about 43,000 immigration court hearings have been canceled as a result of the federal government shutdown. It’s estimated that 20,000 more will be nixed every week from here on out as long as the political standoff over a border wall continues. Here in New Mexico, immigration lawyers and their clients are feeling the effects.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation about border security tonight (Tuesday, Jan. 8). Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Charles Schumer will give a joint response immediately following. The government is partially shut down, with Trump in a stalemate with Democrats over funding for a wall along the southern border. Watch his remarks live.

Alma Rosa Silva-Banuelos

Central American transgender women who are seeking asylum in the U.S. are sent by immigration officials to a detention pod in rural New Mexico. This year, volunteers from many organizations here came together to help them. The work started as kind of a scramble, but over time, quick coordination has smoothed out.

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Transgender asylum-seekers are detained in a special unit in New Mexico’s Cibola County Correctional Center. A Santa Fe legal group is working with transgender people from the new caravan at the border to try and minimize their time in lockup here.

KNME Candidate Forum

Democratic U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich won a second term last night, beating Republican Mick Rich and Libertarian Gary Johnson.

May Ortega | KUNM

 

Immigration is one of this election’s biggest issues.

Tammy WilkersonHill-Fisher teaches English as a second language with the Immigrant and Refugee Resource Village of Albuquerque, and that's definitely one of her biggest political drivers.

Immigration And The 2018 Election

Oct 17, 2018
pixel2013 via Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/en/america-mexico-border-elections-1999384/ / Creative Commons

Let's Talk New Mexico 10/18 8a: Immigration is a big issue in this year’s midterm election. The border wall, separating immigrant families and reforming the visa system are some of the issues that have politicians taking sides. But Congress has accomplished little on immigration reform and the fate of the Deferred Action for Childhood Action program is still uncertain. Is immigration a major election issue for you? Do you feel you’ve heard enough on immigration from the candidates? We’d like to hear from you – email LetsTalk@kunm.org or call in live during the show. 

Marisa Demarco / KUNM

Hundreds of students around the state are affected by the Trump administration’s amped-up immigration rhetoric, and teachers are seeing the effects in their classrooms. The New Mexico Dream Team held a training for University of New Mexico faculty, instructors and staff on Friday.

Fred Ngomokwe / Courtesy Jennifer Moore

  Friday 8/17: Immigrant. Refugee. Asylum. These are words we’ve been hearing a lot this year. But what are the laws around refugees in the United States and internationally and is the U.S. following its legal obligations? On this episode of University Showcase, we talk with Professor Jennifer Moore. She's an expert on refugee law and teaches it at UNM.

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Let’s Talk New Mexico 5/10 8a: About one in four New Mexicans has an EBT card in their wallet that they use to buy food. We’re continuing the conversation this week about food assistance and new work requirements that Congress is considering in the 2018 Farm Bill.

Immigration and border security have dominated the headlines this week in New Mexico and across the nation. Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa has been covering these issues for many years and she says this is one of the most horrible, beautiful times to be a journalist. The founder of The Futuro Media Group spoke with KUNM's Megan Kamerick. 

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