Ty Bannerman

Host, Reporter

Ty Bannerman has been writing about New Mexico for over a decade. He is the author of the history book Forgotten Albuquerque and his work has appeared in New Mexico Magazine, Atlas Obscura, Eater, and the American Literary Review. While at the Weekly Alibi, Albuquerque’s alternative newspaper, he served as food editor, features editor and managing editor. He co-hosts two podcasts: City on the Edge, which tells Albuquerque stories, and Anytown, USA, which virtually explores a different US county each week. He has two children and way too many dogs and chickens.

Leslie Peterson via Flickr

In 2016, thousands of people from many tribal nations converged to support the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota in trying to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline was built anyway, and it has sprung leaks since it was constructed. But this week, a federal judge ordered the Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL, to stop transporting oil pending a full environmental review. 

 

Liz Mckenzie is a New Mexico musician who traveled to Standing Rock in 2016 with supplies and lived there for months as water protectors faced state violence. She spoke with KUNM, first offering a land acknowledgement.

Selinda Guerrero, Facebook video

 


Despite the New Mexico Supreme Court's temporary stay on evictions, the Bernalillo County Sheriff's department Monday served eviction papers to Albuquerque Mutual Aid organizer Selinda Guerrero. The community group, which has operated mostly out of her home since March, has fed thousands of people during the pandemic.

Nash Jones / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 7/2, 8a: Across the nation, people are calling for the removal of monuments and place names that glorify leaders who brutalized Brown and Black people. On Let’s Talk New Mexico this week, we’ll discuss the long history of resistance to Albuquerque’s Juan de Onate statue, the Santa Fe plaza obelisk, a White-centric mural at the University of New Mexico, and more. What do these monuments mean to you? How do they uphold narratives that contribute to the continued oppression of Native Americans and other people of color? What should be the role of public art in telling the whole truth about complex colonial histories? Join the conversation: email letstalk@kunm.org, use the hashtag #LetsTalkNM on Twitter, or call (505) 277-5866 during the show.

Wikimedia via CC

New Mexico residents who receive food assistance will continue to get the maximum amount allowed for their household size through the end of July. The state got a month’s extension on a federal program meant to keep people fed during the pandemic.

Hannah Colton / KUNM


Let's Talk New Mexico 6/18, 8a: With protests against systemic racism and violence continuing around the country, many people are questioning the role of law enforcement and imagining different ways of ensuring public safety. This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’ll discuss a spectrum of changes to New Mexico’s police forces that folks are calling for, from reform efforts like banning chokeholds and training officers differently, to more radical proposals that seek to eliminate traditional policing altogether.