Ty Bannerman

Host, Reporter

Ty Bannerman has been writing about New Mexico for over a decade. He is the author of the history book Forgotten Albuquerque and his work has appeared in New Mexico Magazine, Atlas Obscura, Eater, and the American Literary Review. While at the Weekly Alibi, Albuquerque’s alternative newspaper, he served as food editor, features editor and managing editor. He co-hosts two podcasts: City on the Edge, which tells Albuquerque stories, and Anytown, USA, which virtually explores a different US county each week. He has two children and way too many dogs and chickens.

Hannah Colton / KUNM

The 2020 Census ends on September 30, a full month earlier than previously announced. Nationally, 15% of households have yet to be counted, and response rates are even lower in New Mexico. This week, we’ll discuss the final Census push amid the dangers of COVID-19, and how an undercount could exacerbate racial and economic inequities in our state.

SWOP

Let's Talk New Mexico 8/20 8a: Did you know that your kids can get free crafting kits from the Española Public Library? Or that you can take virtual tours of many of the state's museums? Or that several organizations around New Mexico provide free PPE to those in need? On the next Let's Talk New Mexico, it’s the return of our annual free stuff show (2020 COVID edition), and we’re talking about what’s available for no cost during the pandemic.

Paul Tashjian, Audubon New Mexico


Let's Talk New Mexico 8/11 8a: The Navajo community of To'Hajiilee faces severe water shortages and has worked with Bernalillo County to find a way to pipe in water from Albuquerque. But a land development company stands in the way. On this week’s Let’s Talk New Mexico, we'll discuss the To'Hajiilee water crisis, plus the aftereffects of the 2015 Gold King Mine spill and this year’s dramatic increase in water use in New Mexico's largest city.

pexels.com via CC


Let’s Talk New Mexico 7/16, 8a: Journalism is changing. All reporters are both living in the pandemic and reporting on it. Local student journalists are calling on newsrooms to acknowledge the racism hidden in how objectivity plays out in newsrooms. On this week's Let's Talk New Mexico, we’re discussing decision-making in news and reckoning with a history of racism in media.

And we want to hear from you!  How do you decide whether you can trust a New Mexican news source? What might make you lose that trust? Join the conversation by emailing letstalk@kunm.org or calling in on the day of the show.

Leslie Peterson via Flickr

In 2016, thousands of people from many tribal nations converged to support the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota in trying to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline was built anyway, and it has sprung leaks since it was constructed. But this week, a federal judge ordered the Dakota Access Pipeline, or DAPL, to stop transporting oil pending a full environmental review. 

 

Liz Mckenzie is a New Mexico musician who traveled to Standing Rock in 2016 with supplies and lived there for months as water protectors faced state violence. She spoke with KUNM, first offering a land acknowledgement.

Selinda Guerrero, Facebook video

 


Despite the New Mexico Supreme Court's temporary stay on evictions, the Bernalillo County Sheriff's department Monday served eviction papers to Albuquerque Mutual Aid organizer Selinda Guerrero. The community group, which has operated mostly out of her home since March, has fed thousands of people during the pandemic.

Nash Jones / KUNM

Let's Talk New Mexico 7/2, 8a: Across the nation, people are calling for the removal of monuments and place names that glorify leaders who brutalized Brown and Black people. On Let’s Talk New Mexico this week, we’ll discuss the long history of resistance to Albuquerque’s Juan de Onate statue, the Santa Fe plaza obelisk, a White-centric mural at the University of New Mexico, and more. What do these monuments mean to you? How do they uphold narratives that contribute to the continued oppression of Native Americans and other people of color? What should be the role of public art in telling the whole truth about complex colonial histories? Join the conversation: email letstalk@kunm.org, use the hashtag #LetsTalkNM on Twitter, or call (505) 277-5866 during the show.

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New Mexico residents who receive food assistance will continue to get the maximum amount allowed for their household size through the end of July. The state got a month’s extension on a federal program meant to keep people fed during the pandemic.

Hannah Colton / KUNM


Let's Talk New Mexico 6/18, 8a: With protests against systemic racism and violence continuing around the country, many people are questioning the role of law enforcement and imagining different ways of ensuring public safety. This week on Let’s Talk New Mexico, we’ll discuss a spectrum of changes to New Mexico’s police forces that folks are calling for, from reform efforts like banning chokeholds and training officers differently, to more radical proposals that seek to eliminate traditional policing altogether. 

Hannah Colton / KUNM


Lets Talk New Mexico 4/30, 8a: Some New Mexicans are talking about reopening businesses in defiance of Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham’s stay-at-home order, and mayors of 19 municipalities in the state recently signed on to a letter requesting that the governor allow them to reopen. However, health care workers say that could make things worse for those on the front lines of the COVID pandemic. This week, we’re talking about calls to reopen the economy, what that timeline could look like, and what it might mean for New Mexicans. 

Let's Talk New Mexico 3/24, 8a: Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham went live before tens of thousands of New Mexicans on Monday afternoon with a new public health order in response to the coronavirus outbreak: close all "non-essential businesses," limit public outings to groups of five, and stay at home as much as possible. The order says violators "could lose licenses to operate and face civil or criminal penalties." How does this change life for you and your loved ones? What worries you most about the pandemic in your town, and what kinds of things do you want to hear from your elected leaders? We're continuing our daily call-in shows about COVID-19 in New Mexico, and we want to hear from you. Email letstalk@kunm.org anytime or call in live during the show at (505) 277-5866 or 1-877-899-5866.

Arianna Sena / KUNM

  Let's Talk New Mexico 3/5 8a: Lobbyists spent more than $195,000 on events, meals and giveaways for state legislators during the 2019 legislative session, working out to more than $6,500 a day. Ethics advocates worry that this kind of spending influences those legislators’ decisions in the Roundhouse, and think the public has a right to know exactly what’s going on.