University Showcase

Friday 8:00am-8:30am

Interviews with students, teachers and researchers doing interesting work at the University of New Mexico.

Courtesy UNM Press


  Two years after he defeated the so-called “Great White Hope,” legendary boxer Jack Johnson fought another white challenger determined to topple him as heavyweight champion of the world. It took place on July 4, 1912 in Las Vegas, New Mexico, and is the subject of the book “Crazy Fourth: How Jack Johnson Kept His Title and Put Las Vegas New Mexico on the Map,”  just published by University of New Mexico Press.

Robert Smith via Flickr

University Showcase 5/15 8a: The coronavirus pandemic has not only created a public health crisis, but also an economic one. New Mexico has been particularly hard hit because of the plunge in global oil prices and the complete shutdown in travel and tourism. Small businesses, who make up much of the state’s economy, are also being hit hard. We’ll explore what to expect in coming months.

Christina Salas


  University Showcase 4/17, 8a: During this time of the COVID-19 pandemic, people from all over our community are stepping up to help. That’s true as well at the University of New Mexico. On this episode we hear about efforts to create personal protective equipment for medical workers and others.

Henry "Hy" Mayer - Puck Magazine, February 20, 1915, pp. 14-15 Cornell University: Persuasive Cartography: The PJ Mode Collection / Public Domain

University Showcase 3/20, 8a: This year marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote in the United States.

But for women in the Wyoming Territory that right came in 1869. On this episode, we explore the history of women's suffrage in the West and in New Mexico.


  University Showcase 2/21 8a: Alzheimer’s and dementia represent a growing crisis around the world and New Mexico faces many challenges in addressing these illnesses.

Junior Lilbby / Public Domain Pictures

University Showcase, Friday 01/17 8a: First responders undergo enormous stress on their jobs. They run into burning buildings, pull people from mangled cars, respond to mass shootings, help people overdosing on drugs and treat patients in emergency rooms. Many struggle at times with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and thoughts of suicide.

Jared Rendon-Trompak / Andrea Polli

We are awash in data and it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by it or even ignore it, but Andrea Polli’s work strives to make that data visually compelling and even beautiful. 

Shahen books via Flickr / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en

University Showcase 11/22 Friday 8a: Professor Harry Van Buren was looking for a new adventure when he took a two-year leave from the Anderson School of Management to teach at American University of Beirut. He got more than he bargained for when massive protests broke out six weeks into his arrival.

geralt / Pixabay.com

University Showcase 10/18 Fri 8a: New Mexico leads the nation in alcohol-related mortality and around the world alcohol use disorder is a leading cause of preventable death. On this episode, Regents’ Professor Katie Witkiewitz talks about new trends in research and treatment of alcohol use disorder.

D. Davis National Park Service

University Showcase 9/20, 8a: In 2009, Professor Patricia L. Crown uncovered the first evidence of chocolate consumption in North America in jars from Chaco Culture National Historic Park in Northwest NM. On this episode, we discuss what this discovery reveals about Chaco rituals and civilization, including the extent of trading networks across the Southwest and MesoAmerica.

DrStew82 via Flickr / Creative Commons

University Showcase 8/16 8a:  In August 1619, the first kidnapped Africans arrived on the shores of Virginia, which was then a British Colony. This was the beginning of slavery in this country, but it was also a time when relationships were more nuanced and complex than we have been led to believe.

National Institute on Aging, NIH


University Showcase 7/19 8a: Alzheimer’s affects about 43 million people worldwide and the rate continues to escalate. Researchers at the University of New Mexico have developed a vaccine that could possibly prevent tau tangles, once of the proteins that accumulates in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, which could prevent cognitive decline that comes with the illness.

AMOS Health and Hope

University Showcase, Friday 6/21 8a:  How can health care professionals work with communities as partners to improve health care outcomes? On this episode we talk with Dr. Laura Chanchien Parajon about community based participatory research. 

University Showcase 5/17 8a: Jim Linnell was six months away from retirement from the University of New Mexico when he became a quadriplegic. His new book, “Take It Lying Down,” chronicles his life since the accident.

JAK Media

University Showcase 4/19 8a: How can studying design help children with math and geometry? How does the design of a classroom help or hinder academic achievement? On this episode, we talk with Anne Taylor. She has spent much of her career creating learning environments that foster innovation and intrigue at schools, in the United States and internationally.

Jonathan Alvarez via Wikimedia / Creative Commons


  University Showcase, 3/15, 8a: As the turmoil continues in Venezuela, we talk with several professors at the University of New Mexico to gain some context and understanding of the crisis.

Harvey K via Flickr / Creative Commons

University Showcase: For years New Mexico has languished at or near the bottom nationally for child well-being and one factor behind that ranking is our high rates of child abuse. Many of those cases come through the Child Abuse Response Team -- or CART -- at the University of New Mexico Hospital.

University Showcase 1/18 8a:   On this episode we speak with Anthony Anella and Mark Childs about their book “Imagine a City That Remembers: The Albuquerque Rephotography Project," published by University of New Mexico Press.

Megan Kamerick

  University Showcase, 12/21 8a: Climate change is not theoretical in New Mexico. It's here and already having serious impacts on our communities. Professor David Gutzler says we have no choice but to adapt and incorporate this reality into our policies statewide. 

University Showcase 11/16 8a: More than 14,000 New Mexicans served in World War I, less than a decade after the state finally gained statehood. Thousands of others contributed to the effort on the homefront. Many citizens were eager to prove their patriotism after years of skepticism about making New Mexico part of the U.S.

Megan Kamerick

In one year on average more than 116,000 people in America are shot by guns. These include murders, assaults, suicides and suicide attempts, unintentional shootings and police interventions. That grim statistic provides the backdrop for a new exhibit at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico, "Gun Violence: A Brief Cultural History." It’s at the Maxwell Museum through November 10th.

SilverGryphon8 via CC / CREATIVE COMMONS

  Friday 9/21: This episode is all about the brain. Dr. Elaine Bearer is a neuropathologist at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Her work has includes studying biomarkers of trauma and abuse in children and whether the cause of Alzheimer's disease may come from infections. Dr. Bearer is also a composer and it was music that spurred her interest in studying the brain.

Fred Ngomokwe / Courtesy Jennifer Moore

  Friday 8/17: Immigrant. Refugee. Asylum. These are words we’ve been hearing a lot this year. But what are the laws around refugees in the United States and internationally and is the U.S. following its legal obligations? On this episode of University Showcase, we talk with Professor Jennifer Moore. She's an expert on refugee law and teaches it at UNM.

Catherine Page Harris

Friday 7/20 8a: On University Showcase, the Diné Red Water Pond Road Community on the Navajo Nation has grappled for years with the contamination from tailings left from uranium mines. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency wants to relocate the community, but members do not want to leave their land and see a solution in moving to the top of a nearby mesa.

Prevention Research Center

Friday 6/15 8a: The Prevention Research Center at the University of New Mexico does not show up in rural communities to proscribe solutions. Rather it works hand in hand with the people of those communities to create projects that address needs local needs and priorities. This often means adapting established reseaerch to the unique needs of rural New Mexico.

Catherine Page Harris


  Friday 5/18 8a: During the spring semester, professors with the School of Architecture taught two classes where students did projects around Albuquerque, and in collaboration with community members.

Vancouver Film School via Flickr / Creative Commons

  Friday 4/20 8a: The demand for people with project management skills -- which is basically the discipline of managing a specific project from beginning to end -- has grown around New Mexico and the country. One study found that in the next decade employers will need more than 80 million people working in project management-oriented roles.

  3/16 Over the last year numerous protests have erupted around Confederate memorials throughout the South. Here in New Mexico we have also grappled with a history of colonialism and racism. That has played out at the annual Entrada during Santa Fe’s Fiestas, and at the University of New Mexico, where there have also been protests and calls for change around the university’s official seal and murals created in 1939 in the Zimmerman Library. The Three Peoples murals have been criticized for decades for what people have called racist and inaccurate depictions.

02/16 Professor Heather Canavan had a practice of giving her students extra credit for using their knowledge to design products for real-world problems. She's also a breast cancer survivor and she used these experiences to launch Adaptive Biomedical Design with doctoral student Phong Nguyen in 2017.

The startup has brought together students and other potential inventors, including health care workers, to create inventions like a new way to prep for colonoscopies that incorporates boba tea.

John Hain via Pixabay / Creative Commons

As women -- and men -- continue to come forward with allegations of sexual harassment and assault by powerful men, there’s a related issue that hasn’t received as much attention: Bullying. The two often occur together. Workplace bullying is more common than many may realize.

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